Xem Nhiều 11/2022 #️ Why I Don’t Use Custom Table Styles In Microsoft Word 2002 And 2003 / 2023 # Top 19 Trend | Trucbachconcert.com

Xem Nhiều 11/2022 # Why I Don’t Use Custom Table Styles In Microsoft Word 2002 And 2003 / 2023 # Top 19 Trend

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Why I don’t use Custom Table Styles in Microsoft Word 2002 and 2003

Quick Reference: Why I don’t use Table Styles in Word 2002 or 2003

I’ve given up trying to use Table Styles for professional documentation. This page explains why.

In Word 2002, Microsoft introduced Table Styles. “Wow!”, I thought. Table Styles promised a quick way to format tables consistently and easily.

And on the face of it, they do.

In my work, I create templates for professional use. I need to define custom ways to control table formatting in several subtle ways. Using custom Table Styles should be the answer to my needs. But I don’t find them useful.

Microsoft has never documented how they work. I’ve only been able to discover how they work through trial and error, and from reading about other users’ frustrations on Microsoft’s newsgroups.

Every few months since Word 2002 was introduced, I’ve experimented with Table Styles. Every few months I’ve been disappointed, because they never give me quite what I need.

This is why I’ve finally given up on them.

Table Styles aren’t a grouping of paragraph styles

Paragraph styles are the basic mechanism for formatting text in Word. You can’t do serious work without coming to grips with them.

In my view, Table Styles should be a mechanism for identifying which paragraph styles I want used in my text + the overall settings the table itself needs.

But that’s not how Table Styles work. They apply direct formatting to my text, and they don’t play nicely with paragraph styles.

Table Styles don’t play nicely with Paragraph Styles

If text in the paragraph is in any paragraph style other than Normal, then sometimes the formatting of the Table Style over‑rides the paragraph style, and sometimes vice versa. For example:

if the Table Style is formatted so that the text is right‑aligned, and I apply a paragraph style that is left‑aligned, then the text will be right‑aligned. The Table Style “wins” the alignment debate.

if the Table Style is formatted with 9pt font, and I apply a paragraph style that has 10pt font, then the text will be 10pt. The paragraph style “wins” the font size debate.

This leaves me frustrated and confused. I apply a paragraph style to text in my table, and Word applies only some of the paragraph style’s settings. Only by trial and error can I can work out which settings of a paragraph style will be applied to the text in a table.

As a user, this single reason is sufficient for me to avoid Table Styles.

Table Styles apply fonts inconsistently

The font identified for the Table Style appears to be applied inconsistently. From testing with trial and error, the rules appear to be the following.

If I apply a Table Style to a table, and if the Table Style uses the same font as the document’s Normal style, then the font in the Table Style is applied to text in the table.

If I apply a Table Style to a table, and if the Table Style uses a font that is different from the document’s Normal style, then:

if the text in the table is in style Normal, the font specified in the Table Style is ignored.

if the style of the text in the table is in some other paragraph style, then the other style’s font is respected and the other paragraph style’s font is applied to the text.

Table Styles apply font sizes inconsistently

The font size defined in a Table Style will only be applied to my table if the document’s Normal style happens to be either 10pt or 12pt.

If the document’s Normal style uses, say, Times New Roman 11pt, then any font size I define in the Table Style is ignored.

Furthermore, I can only use 10pt fonts in a Table Style if the document’s Normal style is in 10pt. If style Normal is in some other size, I can have 9pt, or 11pt in my Table Style, but not 10pt.

Table Styles expect that all text in my table is in style Normal

When I go to insert a table, my cursor is obviously within a paragraph of text. When I insert a table, the text in the table is automatically formatted in the style of that paragraph.

table and use a particular Table Style. I insert the table, and I apply the Table Style.

But the text in the table will now be in paragraph style Body Text. And, as we’ve seen, Table Styles don’t play nicely with paragraph styles.

The only way I can get the Table Style settings to work is to select the whole table, and apply style Normal.

Table Styles are difficult for developers to use

I create lots of Word templates for clients. I’ve long since automated a lot of that work, partly because it speeds up the process, and partly because I can replicate a template with accuracy that I can’t achieve if I do it by hand.

However, a Table Style cannot be entirely constructed in code. That is because some parts of a Table Style are not exposed in Word’s object model. For example, in the user interface, I can specify that the heading row in a Table Style is to repeat at the top of each page. I cannot do that when defining a Table Style in code.

Therefore, tools to create a Table Style or to “fix up” messy tables will not work completely.

What would I have to do to use a Table Style successfully?

So, to use a Table Style successfully I would have to:

modify the Table Style to use the same font as my document’s Normal style

if I need the Table Style to use 10pt text, I must ensure that the document’s Normal style is in 10pt text

each time I insert a table, I must apply the Table Style, then select the whole table and apply style Normal (or, I must apply style Normal, then insert the table and apply the Table Style)

if I want to stay sane, I must avoid applying a paragraph style to text in a table

I have to give up on the idea of creating Table Styles in code.

Since I’ve never had a document for which these rules are appropriate, I have given up on trying to use Table Styles to format my tables.

Is Word 2007 going to solve these problems?

I don’t know yet. Certainly there have been some changes. But as far as I know, Microsoft has not yet documented how Table Styles work. So the only way to find out is trial and error.

Resources

If you’re looking for more information about Table Styles, try the following:

Why I Don’T Use Custom Table Styles In Microsoft Word 2002 And 2003 / 2023

Quick Reference: Why I don’t use Table Styles in Word 2002 or 2003

I’ve given up trying to use Table Styles for professional documentation. This page explains why.

In Word 2002, Microsoft introduced Table Styles. “Wow!”, I thought. Table Styles promised a quick way to format tables consistently and easily.

And on the face of it, they do.

In my work, I create templates for professional use. I need to define custom ways to control table formatting in several subtle ways. Using custom Table Styles should be the answer to my needs. But I don’t find them useful.

Microsoft has never documented how they work. I’ve only been able to discover how they work through trial and error, and from reading about other users’ frustrations on Microsoft’s newsgroups.

Every few months since Word 2002 was introduced, I’ve experimented with Table Styles. Every few months I’ve been disappointed, because they never give me quite what I need.

This is why I’ve finally given up on them.

Table Styles aren’t a grouping of paragraph styles

Paragraph styles are the basic mechanism for formatting text in Word. You can’t do serious work without coming to grips with them.

In my view, Table Styles should be a mechanism for identifying which paragraph styles I want used in my text + the overall settings the table itself needs.

But that’s not how Table Styles work. They apply direct formatting to my text, and they don’t play nicely with paragraph styles.

Table Styles don’t play nicely with Paragraph Styles

If text in the paragraph is in any paragraph style other than Normal, then sometimes the formatting of the Table Style over‑rides the paragraph style, and sometimes vice versa. For example:

if the Table Style is formatted so that the text is right‑aligned, and I apply a paragraph style that is left‑aligned, then the text will be right‑aligned. The Table Style “wins” the alignment debate.

if the Table Style is formatted with 9pt font, and I apply a paragraph style that has 10pt font, then the text will be 10pt. The paragraph style “wins” the font size debate.

This leaves me frustrated and confused. I apply a paragraph style to text in my table, and Word applies only some of the paragraph style’s settings. Only by trial and error can I can work out which settings of a paragraph style will be applied to the text in a table.

As a user, this single reason is sufficient for me to avoid Table Styles.

Table Styles apply fonts inconsistently

The font identified for the Table Style appears to be applied inconsistently. From testing with trial and error, the rules appear to be the following.

If I apply a Table Style to a table, and if the Table Style uses the same font as the document’s Normal style, then the font in the Table Style is applied to text in the table.

If I apply a Table Style to a table, and if the Table Style uses a font that is different from the document’s Normal style, then:

if the text in the table is in style Normal, the font specified in the Table Style is ignored.

if the style of the text in the table is in some other paragraph style, then the other style’s font is respected and the other paragraph style’s font is applied to the text.

Table Styles apply font sizes inconsistently

The font size defined in a Table Style will only be applied to my table if the document’s Normal style happens to be either 10pt or 12pt.

If the document’s Normal style uses, say, Times New Roman 11pt, then any font size I define in the Table Style is ignored.

Furthermore, I can only use 10pt fonts in a Table Style if the document’s Normal style is in 10pt. If style Normal is in some other size, I can have 9pt, or 11pt in my Table Style, but not 10pt.

Table Styles expect that all text in my table is in style Normal

When I go to insert a table, my cursor is obviously within a paragraph of text. When I insert a table, the text in the table is automatically formatted in the style of that paragraph.

But the text in the table will now be in paragraph style Body Text. And, as we’ve seen, Table Styles don’t play nicely with paragraph styles.

The only way I can get the Table Style settings to work is to select the whole table, and apply style Normal.

Table Styles are difficult for developers to use

I create lots of Word templates for clients. I’ve long since automated a lot of that work, partly because it speeds up the process, and partly because I can replicate a template with accuracy that I can’t achieve if I do it by hand.

However, a Table Style cannot be entirely constructed in code. That is because some parts of a Table Style are not exposed in Word’s object model. For example, in the user interface, I can specify that the heading row in a Table Style is to repeat at the top of each page. I cannot do that when defining a Table Style in code.

Therefore, tools to create a Table Style or to “fix up” messy tables will not work completely.

What would I have to do to use a Table Style successfully?

So, to use a Table Style successfully I would have to:

modify the Table Style to use the same font as my document’s Normal style

if I need the Table Style to use 10pt text, I must ensure that the document’s Normal style is in 10pt text

each time I insert a table, I must apply the Table Style, then select the whole table and apply style Normal (or, I must apply style Normal, then insert the table and apply the Table Style)

if I want to stay sane, I must avoid applying a paragraph style to text in a table

I have to give up on the idea of creating Table Styles in code.

Since I’ve never had a document for which these rules are appropriate, I have given up on trying to use Table Styles to format my tables.

Is Word 2007 going to solve these problems?

I don’t know yet. Certainly there have been some changes. But as far as I know, Microsoft has not yet documented how Table Styles work. So the only way to find out is trial and error.

If you’re looking for more information about Table Styles, try the following:

Using Tables In Microsoft Word 2010 / 2023

Inserting Tables

Before we identify the different parts of a table, let’s go ahead and insert one into our document. To do this, position the cursor at the point in the document where you want to put the table. Don’t worry if it’s not exactly right-you can always move or manipulate it later.

The tool you’re going to use to insert a table is almost directly under the Insert tab. It looks like this:

Here’s an example of a 3 X 3 table using Insert Table:

We know that, without having to count each box, because Word tells us with the text right above the boxes. See where it says “3×3 Table”? Cool, huh? And convenient.

We now have a basic table. So let’s identify the parts.

Each box is called a “Cell.” There are 9 cells in the example above.

The “Rows” go from top to bottom. In the example below, the rows are numbered from one to three and the 1 st row is highlighted.

Columns go from left to right. In this example, the columns are numbered and the middle column (2.) is highlighted. In a program such as Excel, the rows are usually expressed in numbers while the columns are expressed in letters. For instance, in our example Row 1, Column 2 might be expressed as 1b.

So now that we’ve identified the parts of a table, let’s take a look at the other ways in which we can add them.

Using the Insert Table Dialogue

A dialogue launches in the center of your screen. It looks like this.

By default, the column width will adjust automatically to fit the text and objects you insert into a cell. If you don’t want this to happen, you can select “Fixed column width” and set a fixed value.

Drawing a Table

If you know your table is not going to be uniform (regularly sized columns and rows), you can “draw” a table. This is particularly helpful when using tables to create complex page layouts.

Selecting parts of tables

You can select and change the attributes of any row, column, or individual cell.

You can select an entire table using either of those methods.

Adding Text to a Table

Converting Text into a Table

You can convert text into a table. This is especially handy if you’ve already written information that you think would be more effectively conveyed in a table.

To do this, you’ll have to carve up the text into columns and rows using commas and new paragraphs. That’s how you tell Word to separate the text into individual cells. Simply place a comma between the text you want to put into a column and place a paragraph where you want to begin a new row. An example of the text might look like this:

Look at the example below to see the final result.

Quick Tables

Formatting Tables with the Table Tools

Whenever you create or select a table, the Table Tools will open automatically over the Design and Layout tabs in the tool bar. It allows you to easily apply table styles, borders, and shading attributes and more. Below is an example of the Design layout tools available for tables.

A zoom of the Design layout tools for tables, left and right is below:

The Layout tab, when associated with the Table Tools, allows you to easily insert rows and columns, and format text and objects within cells. The Table Tools ribbon is below and the zoom of their left and right sections is below it.

Adjusting the Width of Individual Columns

There are several ways to adjust the width of individual columns:

o Select the column, then go to the Table Tool/Layout tab and type a figure into the Width box as in the following example.

Adjusting Width of All Columns

To fix the width of all of the columns at once, select the entire table and use the Width box in the Table Tool/Layout tab to adjust the columns to the desired size.

You can also use the Distribute Columns button to make all of the columns the same size.

Adjust rows in the same way, except use the Height field.

Adding Rows and Columns

There are two ways to add a new row or column to a table.

o Insert Columns to the Left

o Insert Columns to the Right

o Choose an option from the Rows & Columns section of the ribbon.

Deleting Cells, Rows or Columns

You will then have the option of deleting a cell, a row, a column, or the entire table.

Merging Cells and Splitting Cells

Borders and Shading

The way information in a table is presented determines how easily it can be understood. Use the borders and shading features to control the look of a table.

The borders and shading tools can be found in the Table Styles group on the Design tab under Table Tools.

Microsoft Word 2010 provides some customizable templates. Roll your mouse over one of them, and you will see a preview in your selected table.

Use the Borders button to add or remove borders or adjust the stroke width. Use the Shading feature to control the color of a cell, row or column.

A drop cap is a simple embellishment that, if used correctly, can make your documents look more interesting and professional. Basically, it’s a letter at the beginning of a section or paragraph that is larger than the text that follows it, but instead of extending upward (which is what it would do if you just tried to increase the font size for a single letter) it drops a few lines down:

You can have the letter drop as many lines as you’d like, and even choose how much space to put between it and the text that follows.

Watermarks

You’re probably familiar with watermarks. They can sometimes be seen stamped into expensive bond paper, and they are visible when you hold twenty-dollar-bills up to the light. You’re probably thinking, though, “Cool, Word 2010 can do that?” The answer is, “Sort of.”

A real watermark is stamped into a page with expensive equipment. All Word 2010 does, really, is allows you to place a light, printable image behind all the text and objects in a document. You can use it to add an effect to the document, mark it as a sample or draft, or even authenticate it.

Unlike most objects that can be inserted into a document, the watermark button isn’t located on the Insert tab. Instead, to place one in your document, go to the Page Layout tab and look at the Page Background section of the ribbon. It is placed here because really, that’s what a watermark is-a background. It cannot be manipulated or moved around like other objects.

Borders and Shading

Borders can be applied to an entire page, an entire document, or just certain sections of the document. They can also be applied to paragraphs.

(Archives) Microsoft Word 2003: Calculations Within Tables / 2023

Last updated

This article is based on legacy software.

Rather than performing calculations by hand, you can do basic calculations within your Word table. If your table contains several calculations, a worksheet like Excel may be a better option. The same principles of doing calculations in worksheets are used in Word. Instead of entering the actual value you want to use for the calculation, you will be referring to the cell containing the value. The cell reference is in the form of “Column ID, Row ID.” The columns are referred to by letters starting at “A.” The rows are referred to by numbers starting at 1. The first cell of the table (i.e., first column, first row) is referred to as A1.

This document explains how to use calculations within tables.

Formula Examples

Like pressing addition or multiplication keys on a calculator, you need to designate the appropriate actions when writing formulas. These actions are referred to as operators; the following comprise the basic formula operators:

Addition

+

Multiplication

*

Subtraction

Division

/

The following table is an example of a completed travel budget that may be included in a proposal for attending a conference. Following the first table is a description of the formulas used to perform the calculations within the table (indicated by the gray shading).

Formula for Actual Formula About the Formula

Hotel

=69.95*3

Computes the total cost for the hotel stay by multiplying 69.95 by 3

Meals

=50*4

Computes the total cost of the meals by multiplying 50 by 4

Total Conference Budget

=sum (above)

Calculates the total of the costs by adding the values above the formula (B2 through B6)

Department Contribution

=b6-b7

Calculates the department contribution by subtracting the grant request from the total conference budget

Inserting Formulas

To insert a formula, determine the values or cell references required for the formula and then follow these instructions:

Place your insertion point in the cell where you want to place the formula

From the Table menu, select Formula… The Formula dialog box appears. HINT: Similar to Excel, based on the numbers in the table and the location of the cell in which you want to place the formula, Word will guess what type of formula you may want (e.g., to add all cells to the left of the formula,=SUM (LEFT) may be placed in the Formula text box).

In the Formula text box, type the desired formula

If necessary, from the Number format pull-down list, select the desired format for the result

Recalculating Formulas

To update values in a table, recalculate the formula(s) using one of the following methods.

Recalculate the Value of an Individual Cell: Keyboard Option

Windows only:

Place your insertion point in the cell, before the numerals

Press [ F9]OR Press [ Alt] + [ Shift] + [ U] The formula is recalculated.

Recalculate the Value of an Individual Cell: Mouse Option

Place your insertion point in the cell, before the numerals

Recalculating the Values of the Entire Table

Windows:

Place your insertion point within the table

From the Table menu, select Select ” Table The entire table is selected.

Press [ F9]OR Press [ ALT] + [ Shift] + [ U] All formulas are recalculated.

Macintosh:

From the Edit menu, select Select All

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