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Xem Nhiều 2/2023 # Using Tables In Word 2022 # Top 3 Trend

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Inserting Tables

Before we identify the different parts of a table, let’s go ahead and insert one into our document. To do this, position the cursor at the point in the document where you want to put the table. Don’t worry if it’s not exactly right–you can always move or manipulate it later.

You’ll find tables under the Insert tab in the Tables group. The Tables button looks like this:

You’ll see a bunch of boxes at the top.

The easiest way to insert a table is to drag your mouse over the rows and columns until you have the amount you want.

As you can see above, we dragged our mouse to make a table that has seven columns and three rows, or 7×3.  

As we drag the table appears on our document:

We now have a basic table.

Let’s identify the parts.

Each box that you see in a table is called a “Cell.”  There are 21 cells in the table above. We have highlighted a cell in the snapshot below.

The “Rows” go from top to bottom. There are three rows. Rows go horizontally across the screen.

Columns go from left to right. There are seven columns above. Columns are vertical.  

So now that we’ve identified the parts of a table, let’s take a look at the other ways in which we can add them.

Using the Insert Table Dialogue

A dialogue launches in the center of your screen. It looks like this.

From here you can select the number of rows and columns. In this example, there are going to 5 columns, and 2 rows. Select your preferences in the AutoFit behavior section. You can set a fit column width, make the width of the cells and table fit to the content, or make the table size fit to the window.

Drawing a Table

If you know your table is not going to be uniform (regularly sized columns and rows), you can “draw” a table. This is particularly helpful when using tables to create complex page layouts.

Selecting parts of tables

Adding Text to a Table

Position Text within a Cell

Just like in an ordinary document, you can choose whether to center text within a cell, or whether to align it right or left, or toward the top or the bottom. Go to the Alignment group under the Table Layout tab. 

The Alignment group is pictured below.

Using the graphics on the left as guides, select how you want text positioned within cell in your table. 

NOTE: You can format the text position for just one cell, multiple cells (by selecting the cells), or the entire table (by selecting the table).

Converting Text into a Table

You can convert text into a table. This is especially handy if you’ve already written information that you think would be more effectively conveyed in a table.

To do this, you’ll have to carve up the text into columns and rows using commas and new paragraphs. That’s how you tell Word to separate the text into individual cells. Simply place a comma between the text you want to put into a column and place a paragraph where you want to begin a new row. An example of the text might look like this:

You can now specify the number of columns, as well as how to separate text. You can separate text into cells by paragraphs, commas, tabs, etc.

We chose two columns and to separate text at commas.

Look at the example below to see the final result.

Quick Tables

Formatting Tables with the Table Tools

Whenever you create or select a table, the Table Tools will open automatically over the Design and Layout tabs in the tool bar. It allows you to easily apply table styles, borders, and shading attributes and more. Below is an example of the Design and Layout tools available for tables.

The Design tab (shown above) lets you customize the look and appearance of your table.

Let’s look at the Table Style Options group. But first, look at our table below:

In the Table Style Options group, we see that Header Row, First Column, and Banded Rows are checked.

Let’s learn what all these options mean so you can decide what you want checked – and what you don’t.

Using Tables In Microsoft Word 2010

Inserting Tables

Before we identify the different parts of a table, let’s go ahead and insert one into our document. To do this, position the cursor at the point in the document where you want to put the table. Don’t worry if it’s not exactly right-you can always move or manipulate it later.

The tool you’re going to use to insert a table is almost directly under the Insert tab. It looks like this:

Here’s an example of a 3 X 3 table using Insert Table:

We know that, without having to count each box, because Word tells us with the text right above the boxes. See where it says “3×3 Table”? Cool, huh? And convenient.

We now have a basic table. So let’s identify the parts.

Each box is called a “Cell.” There are 9 cells in the example above.

The “Rows” go from top to bottom. In the example below, the rows are numbered from one to three and the 1 st row is highlighted.

Columns go from left to right. In this example, the columns are numbered and the middle column (2.) is highlighted. In a program such as Excel, the rows are usually expressed in numbers while the columns are expressed in letters. For instance, in our example Row 1, Column 2 might be expressed as 1b.

So now that we’ve identified the parts of a table, let’s take a look at the other ways in which we can add them.

Using the Insert Table Dialogue

A dialogue launches in the center of your screen. It looks like this.

By default, the column width will adjust automatically to fit the text and objects you insert into a cell. If you don’t want this to happen, you can select “Fixed column width” and set a fixed value.

Drawing a Table

If you know your table is not going to be uniform (regularly sized columns and rows), you can “draw” a table. This is particularly helpful when using tables to create complex page layouts.

Selecting parts of tables

You can select and change the attributes of any row, column, or individual cell.

You can select an entire table using either of those methods.

Adding Text to a Table

Converting Text into a Table

You can convert text into a table. This is especially handy if you’ve already written information that you think would be more effectively conveyed in a table.

To do this, you’ll have to carve up the text into columns and rows using commas and new paragraphs. That’s how you tell Word to separate the text into individual cells. Simply place a comma between the text you want to put into a column and place a paragraph where you want to begin a new row. An example of the text might look like this:

Look at the example below to see the final result.

Quick Tables

Formatting Tables with the Table Tools

Whenever you create or select a table, the Table Tools will open automatically over the Design and Layout tabs in the tool bar. It allows you to easily apply table styles, borders, and shading attributes and more. Below is an example of the Design layout tools available for tables.

A zoom of the Design layout tools for tables, left and right is below:

The Layout tab, when associated with the Table Tools, allows you to easily insert rows and columns, and format text and objects within cells. The Table Tools ribbon is below and the zoom of their left and right sections is below it.

Adjusting the Width of Individual Columns

There are several ways to adjust the width of individual columns:

o Select the column, then go to the Table Tool/Layout tab and type a figure into the Width box as in the following example.

Adjusting Width of All Columns

To fix the width of all of the columns at once, select the entire table and use the Width box in the Table Tool/Layout tab to adjust the columns to the desired size.

You can also use the Distribute Columns button to make all of the columns the same size.

Adjust rows in the same way, except use the Height field.

Adding Rows and Columns

There are two ways to add a new row or column to a table.

o Insert Columns to the Left

o Insert Columns to the Right

o Choose an option from the Rows & Columns section of the ribbon.

Deleting Cells, Rows or Columns

You will then have the option of deleting a cell, a row, a column, or the entire table.

Merging Cells and Splitting Cells

Borders and Shading

The way information in a table is presented determines how easily it can be understood. Use the borders and shading features to control the look of a table.

The borders and shading tools can be found in the Table Styles group on the Design tab under Table Tools.

Microsoft Word 2010 provides some customizable templates. Roll your mouse over one of them, and you will see a preview in your selected table.

Use the Borders button to add or remove borders or adjust the stroke width. Use the Shading feature to control the color of a cell, row or column.

A drop cap is a simple embellishment that, if used correctly, can make your documents look more interesting and professional. Basically, it’s a letter at the beginning of a section or paragraph that is larger than the text that follows it, but instead of extending upward (which is what it would do if you just tried to increase the font size for a single letter) it drops a few lines down:

You can have the letter drop as many lines as you’d like, and even choose how much space to put between it and the text that follows.

Watermarks

You’re probably familiar with watermarks. They can sometimes be seen stamped into expensive bond paper, and they are visible when you hold twenty-dollar-bills up to the light. You’re probably thinking, though, “Cool, Word 2010 can do that?” The answer is, “Sort of.”

A real watermark is stamped into a page with expensive equipment. All Word 2010 does, really, is allows you to place a light, printable image behind all the text and objects in a document. You can use it to add an effect to the document, mark it as a sample or draft, or even authenticate it.

Unlike most objects that can be inserted into a document, the watermark button isn’t located on the Insert tab. Instead, to place one in your document, go to the Page Layout tab and look at the Page Background section of the ribbon. It is placed here because really, that’s what a watermark is-a background. It cannot be manipulated or moved around like other objects.

Borders and Shading

Borders can be applied to an entire page, an entire document, or just certain sections of the document. They can also be applied to paragraphs.

Using Pivot Tables In Excel 2022

The only thing in the bottom section that you need to make a pivot table work is Values. You will find that Rows, Columns, and Filters help to organize the data and information in the pivot table.

To see what we mean, let’s choose a column from the top half.

We are going to choose Employee. We want each employee to appear in a row, so we drag it to the Rows section in the bottom half.

We chose Sum of Sales.

We are going to drag Week to the Columns section.

Now, if we look at our pivot table, we see that Excel has summarized the number of sales in our worksheet.

With pivot tables, there is something you need to keep in mind. If you drop a text field into values, Excel will assume you want to count the values. We did this, and it counted the number of occurrences of the item in our data. If you drop a numerical field into Values, Excel will assume you want a sum of the items.

You can also drag and drop to and from Values, Columns, Rows, and Filters.

You can do these things to create the pivot table that you want.

Changing the Formatting and Formulas of PivotTables

It is easy to create a pivot table in Excel 2016, but that is just where the fun begins. Now that you created a pivot table, it is time to learn how to format it.

Below is our pivot table.

If you wanted to format the data in the pivot table, you could do so by selecting a column or row, then going to the Home tab and applying formatting, such as changing the font type, font size, or font color. Those are very basic Excel skills and easy enough for you to do.

However, if you applied formatting in this manner, if you ever refreshed the data in your pivot table or added rows or columns, the formatting might not be applied.

We then see the Value Field Settings dialogue box.

In this dialogue box, we can change the name of the field in the pivot table by going to the Custom Name field.

This will return you to the Value Field Settings dialogue box.

Also in the Value Field Settings dialogue box, we can change the function. Right now, we have it at the default, which is Sum. It can be changed to Count, Average, Max, Min, etc. All of these functions relate to the total sales. For example, average of total sales, and so on.

You can also add the same field more than once.

This means that, if you wanted, you could change the function for the Sales field to Count. Then, you could drag the Sales field to the Values section again, which would display the Sum of Sales.

Just make sure you change the number format that matches the function. We would not want Currency for Sales function, for example.

Creating Different PivotTables Using the Same Data

You can create as many pivot tables as you need to using the same data from the same worksheet. You can choose to place the pivot tables together, or you can place them in different worksheets.

You can now see our new pivot table below our existing pivot table.

We can now add columns, rows, and values to our new pivot table by following the steps we learned earlier in this article.

Moving PivotTables

You can move a pivot table to a new location within a worksheet or to a new worksheet entirely.

You will then see the Move PivotTable dialogue box.

The pivot table is moved for you.

Deleting PivotTables

This selects the PivotTable.

You can then press Delete on your keyboard.

The Report Filter Option

In the snapshot below, we have a simple pivot table.

You can see that we have dragged and dropped the Employee field into the Rows section, and the Sales field into the Values section in order to create the pivot table.

Now we are going to learn what happens when you drag a field to the Filters section.

For this example, we are going to drag the Territory field to the Filters section.

When we do this, we can see the filter is added above our pivot table.

We can now filter the data in our pivot table by the territory of the employee.

Of course, we can also add another filter to our pivot table to further refine the data that is summarized

Sorting Data in a PivotTable

Data in a pivot table can be sorted by row or column labels, as well as values.

Whenever you create a pivot table, Excel does the sorting for you. Excel puts row and column labels in the order that they appeared in the original data worksheet.

You can see Row Labels circled in red below.

As you can see in the next snapshot, we are now given the ability to sort the labels alphabetically from A to Z, or Z to A.

You will then see the following dialogue box.

Choose if you want to sort the values from A to Z or Z to A by putting a check beside your choice.

In the snapshot above, you see that we can also sort by Sum of Sales – or our values.

Our data is then sorted by values.

Refreshing the Data in a PivotTable

A pivot table is based on data that is contained in a worksheet. If you change the data in the worksheet after you have created a pivot table, you will need to refresh the data in the pivot table so that it reflects the current data in the original worksheet.

Let’s show you what we mean so that it makes sense.

Below is our pivot table.

Now, we are going to go back to our original worksheet.

However, when we go back to our pivot table, our Sum of Sales column still reflects the 21 sales we originally said we made.

We need to refresh the data so the changes made in the original data are reflected in our pivot table.

To do this, go to the Analyze tab under PivotTable Tools. Go to the Refresh dropdown menu, and select Refresh All.

As you can see, the data in our pivot table is now refreshed.

Another thing you can do to make sure that your data stays refreshed is to set your options in Excel so that the data in your pivot table is refreshed each time you open the workbook.

To do this, go to the Analyze tab again.

You will then see this dialogue box:

Verifying the Data in a PivotTable

It is easy to take for granted that the data presented in a pivot table is correct.

However, if you ever wanted to double check to make sure that the data is correct, there is an easy way to do that.

Let’s say we want to verify that the employee named Smith really made 31 sales.

The data shown above is displayed in a new worksheet. You can choose whether you want to keep the worksheet or delete it.

Why I Don’T Use Custom Table Styles In Microsoft Word 2002 And 2003

Quick Reference: Why I don’t use Table Styles in Word 2002 or 2003

I’ve given up trying to use Table Styles for professional documentation. This page explains why.

In Word 2002, Microsoft introduced Table Styles. “Wow!”, I thought. Table Styles promised a quick way to format tables consistently and easily.

And on the face of it, they do.

In my work, I create templates for professional use. I need to define custom ways to control table formatting in several subtle ways. Using custom Table Styles should be the answer to my needs. But I don’t find them useful.

Microsoft has never documented how they work. I’ve only been able to discover how they work through trial and error, and from reading about other users’ frustrations on Microsoft’s newsgroups.

Every few months since Word 2002 was introduced, I’ve experimented with Table Styles. Every few months I’ve been disappointed, because they never give me quite what I need.

This is why I’ve finally given up on them.

Table Styles aren’t a grouping of paragraph styles

Paragraph styles are the basic mechanism for formatting text in Word. You can’t do serious work without coming to grips with them.

In my view, Table Styles should be a mechanism for identifying which paragraph styles I want used in my text + the overall settings the table itself needs.

But that’s not how Table Styles work. They apply direct formatting to my text, and they don’t play nicely with paragraph styles.

Table Styles don’t play nicely with Paragraph Styles

If text in the paragraph is in any paragraph style other than Normal, then sometimes the formatting of the Table Style over‑rides the paragraph style, and sometimes vice versa. For example:

if the Table Style is formatted so that the text is right‑aligned, and I apply a paragraph style that is left‑aligned, then the text will be right‑aligned. The Table Style “wins” the alignment debate.

if the Table Style is formatted with 9pt font, and I apply a paragraph style that has 10pt font, then the text will be 10pt. The paragraph style “wins” the font size debate.

This leaves me frustrated and confused. I apply a paragraph style to text in my table, and Word applies only some of the paragraph style’s settings. Only by trial and error can I can work out which settings of a paragraph style will be applied to the text in a table.

As a user, this single reason is sufficient for me to avoid Table Styles.

Table Styles apply fonts inconsistently

The font identified for the Table Style appears to be applied inconsistently. From testing with trial and error, the rules appear to be the following.

If I apply a Table Style to a table, and if the Table Style uses the same font as the document’s Normal style, then the font in the Table Style is applied to text in the table.

If I apply a Table Style to a table, and if the Table Style uses a font that is different from the document’s Normal style, then:

if the text in the table is in style Normal, the font specified in the Table Style is ignored.

if the style of the text in the table is in some other paragraph style, then the other style’s font is respected and the other paragraph style’s font is applied to the text.

Table Styles apply font sizes inconsistently

The font size defined in a Table Style will only be applied to my table if the document’s Normal style happens to be either 10pt or 12pt.

If the document’s Normal style uses, say, Times New Roman 11pt, then any font size I define in the Table Style is ignored.

Furthermore, I can only use 10pt fonts in a Table Style if the document’s Normal style is in 10pt. If style Normal is in some other size, I can have 9pt, or 11pt in my Table Style, but not 10pt.

Table Styles expect that all text in my table is in style Normal

When I go to insert a table, my cursor is obviously within a paragraph of text. When I insert a table, the text in the table is automatically formatted in the style of that paragraph.

But the text in the table will now be in paragraph style Body Text. And, as we’ve seen, Table Styles don’t play nicely with paragraph styles.

The only way I can get the Table Style settings to work is to select the whole table, and apply style Normal.

Table Styles are difficult for developers to use

I create lots of Word templates for clients. I’ve long since automated a lot of that work, partly because it speeds up the process, and partly because I can replicate a template with accuracy that I can’t achieve if I do it by hand.

However, a Table Style cannot be entirely constructed in code. That is because some parts of a Table Style are not exposed in Word’s object model. For example, in the user interface, I can specify that the heading row in a Table Style is to repeat at the top of each page. I cannot do that when defining a Table Style in code.

Therefore, tools to create a Table Style or to “fix up” messy tables will not work completely.

What would I have to do to use a Table Style successfully?

So, to use a Table Style successfully I would have to:

modify the Table Style to use the same font as my document’s Normal style

if I need the Table Style to use 10pt text, I must ensure that the document’s Normal style is in 10pt text

each time I insert a table, I must apply the Table Style, then select the whole table and apply style Normal (or, I must apply style Normal, then insert the table and apply the Table Style)

if I want to stay sane, I must avoid applying a paragraph style to text in a table

I have to give up on the idea of creating Table Styles in code.

Since I’ve never had a document for which these rules are appropriate, I have given up on trying to use Table Styles to format my tables.

Is Word 2007 going to solve these problems?

I don’t know yet. Certainly there have been some changes. But as far as I know, Microsoft has not yet documented how Table Styles work. So the only way to find out is trial and error.

If you’re looking for more information about Table Styles, try the following:

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