Top 19 # Xóa Row Trong Excel / 2023 Xem Nhiều Nhất, Mới Nhất 12/2022 # Top Trend | Trucbachconcert.com

How To Unhide Rows In Excel / 2023

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Unhiding a Specific Row

Find the hidden row. Look at the row numbers on the left side of the document as you scroll down; if you see a skip in numbers (e.g., row 23 is directly above row 25), the row in between the numbers is hidden (in 23 and 25 example, row 24 would be hidden). You should also see a double line between the two row numbers.

It’s in the drop-down menu. Doing so will prompt the hidden row to appear.

Unhide a range of rows. If you notice that several rows are missing, you can unhide all of the rows by doing the following:

This tab is just below the green ribbon at the top of the Excel window.

If you’re already on the Home tab, skip this step.

This option is in the “Cells” section of the toolbar near the top-right of the Excel window. A drop-down menu will appear.

You’ll find this option in the Format drop-down menu. Selecting it prompts a pop-out menu to appear.

Adjusting Row Height

This tab is just below the green ribbon at the top of the Excel window.

If you’re already on the Home tab, skip this step.

This option is in the “Cells” section of the toolbar near the top-right of the Excel window. A drop-down menu will appear.

It’s in the drop-down menu. This will open a pop-up window with a blank text field in it.

Enter the default row height. Type 14.4 into the pop-up window’s text field.

Community Q&A

Add New Question

The top 7 rows of my Excel worksheet have disappeared. I’ve tried to “unhide” from the Format menu, but nothing happens. What do I do?

You’ll have to unlock the cells (via the format pop-up), then hide them all before unhiding them.

There is a possibility you did not hide the rows but reduced your rows’ height to minimum. Select all rows above and below of your 7 rows and increase rows height from format menu. It will re-adjust the height of rows and your rows will be visible.

This article was written by Jack Lloyd. Jack Lloyd is a Technology Writer and Editor for wikiHow. He has over two years of experience writing and editing technology-related articles. He is technology enthusiast and an English teacher. This article has been viewed 309,392 times.

How helpful is this?

Updated: November 17, 2020

Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 309,392 times.

Robert Theriault

“I had some rows hidden and couldn’t figure out how to unhide the rows. The article solved that problem for me. Thanks” …” more

Hàm Row Và Rows Trong Excel: Định Nghĩa, Cú Pháp, Cách Sử Dụng / 2023

Không chỉ biết về Định nghĩa, cú pháp của 2 hàm Row và Rows. Bạn còn biết thêm về cách vận dụng và ưu nhược điểm của các hàm này trong excel.

1.1. Định nghĩa

Hàm Row: là hàm excel trả về số dòng của 1 ô

Hàm Rows: là hàm excel trả về số lượng dòng của 1 vùng ô hoặc 1 mảng (array)

1.2. Cú pháp

= Row ( Ô cần lấy số dòng )

= Rows ( Vùng ô/ Mảng)

1.3. Ví dụ

= Row (A100) = 100

= Rows (A10:B20) = 11

2. Cách dùng hàm ROW, ROWS trong excel

Có rất nhiều cách áp dụng 1 hàm trong thực tế. Tùy vào nhu cầu của từng công việc mà có thể có các cách vận dụng khác nhau.

Trong phạm vi bài viết này Trường nêu ra 2 ứng dụng phổ biến

2.1. Ứng dụng hàm Row để áp dụng với định dạng có điều kiện

Nếu bạn chưa biết tới hàm Row và cách dùng định dạng có điều kiện thì để làm việc này bạn phải bôi màu một cách thủ công.

Rất mất thời gian.

Nhưng khi làm theo hướng dẫn sau bạn sẽ tô màu tự động cho cả ngàn dòng trong nháy mắt.

B1: Bôi đen vùng ô cần định dạng có điều kiện tự đông

B2: Add new rule trong phần Conditional formating

B3: Nhập công thức trong phần Format rule như sau: =mod(row(),2) =1

B4: Chọn màu nền mong muốn

B5: Nhấn OK là xong

Mấu chốt của vấn đề chính là hàm Row()

Khi bạn không nhập địa chỉ ô trong phần đóng mở ngược thì hàm Row () sẽ trả về số thứ tự dòng của ô chứa công thức.

Hàm Mod sẽ lấy ra phần số dư của việc lấy số thứ tự dòng chia cho 2.

Theo toán học khi chia cho 2 thì phần dư chỉ có thể là 1 (nếu có)

2.2. Vận dụng hàm Rows trong hàm hlookup

Như các bạn đã biết thì hàm Hlookup là hàm tìm kiếm theo dòng.

Trong đó thành phần thứ 3 của hàm tìm kiếm hlookup là số thứ tự dòng chứa giá trị cần tìm.

[ VẤN ĐỀ ]

Nếu sau khi viết hàm vlookup với số thứ dòng ta nhập số ‘chết’, ta chèn thêm dòng vào giữa:

Khi đó, ta phải sửa lại bằng tay số thứ tự dòng trong hàm hlookup.

Kết quả bị sai khi:

File nhiều công thức quá, không kiểm tra hết được những ô nào bị ảnh hưởng

Quên không sửa lại số thứ tự dòng

[ GIẢI PHÁP ]

Bạn dùng hàm Rows để xác định số thứ tự dòng giữa:

Ví dụ:

=Hlookup (“W”, B2:C100, Rows(B2:B50), 0)

Thay cho

=Hlookup (“W”, B2:C100, 49, 0)

Trườngpx – Chuyên gia về Phần mềm Excel doanh nghiệp & Dạy Excel in-house

How To Alphabetize In Excel: Sort Alphabetically Columns And Rows / 2023

This tutorial will teach you a few quick and easy ways to put Excel in alphabetical order. It also provides solutions for non-trivial tasks, for example how to alphabetize by last name when the entries start with the first name.

This tutorial will show you a few quick ways to alphabetize in Excel and teach how to foresee and prevent sorting problems.

How to alphabetize in Excel

Overall, there are 3 main ways to sort alphabetically in Excel: A-Z or Z-A button, the Sort feature, and filter. Below you will find the detailed guidance on each method.

How to sort a column alphabetically

The fastest way to sort alphabetically in Excel is this:

Select any cell in the column you want to sort.

Either way, Excel will alphabetize your list instantaneously:

Alphabetize and keep rows together

If your data set contains two or more columns, you can use the A-Z or Z-A button to put one of the columns in alphabetical order and Excel will automatically move the data in other columns, keeping the rows intact.

As you can see in the sorted table on the right, the related information in each row is kept together:

Filter and alphabetize in Excel

Adding a filter to your table is easy:

Select one or several column headers.

The column is alphabetized straight away, and a small upward arrow on the filter button indicates the sorting order (ascending):

To reverse the order, select Sort Z to A from the filter drop-down menu.

How to put multiple columns in alphabetical order

In case you want to alphabetize data in several columns, use the Excel Sort command, which gives more control over how your data is sorted.

As an example, let’s add one more column to our table, and then arrange the entries alphabetically first by Region, and then by Name:

To have it done, please perform the following steps:

Select the entire table you want to sort.

In most cases, you can select just one cell and Excel will pick the rest of your data automatically, but this is an error-prone approach, especially when there are some gaps (blank cells) within your data.

The Sort dialog box will show up with the first sorting level created for you automatically as Excel sees fit.

In the Sort by dropdown box, select the column you want to alphabetize first, Region in our case. In the other two boxes, leave the default settings: Sort On – Cell values and Order – A to Z:

Tip. If the first dropdown is showing column letters instead of headings, tick off the My data has headers box.

In this example, the second level sorts the values in the Name column alphabetically from A to Z:

Excel will sort your data in the specified order. As shown in the screenshot below, our table is arranged alphabetically exactly as it should: first by Region, and then by Name:

How to sort rows alphabetically in Excel

If your data is arranged horizontally, you may want to sort it alphabetically across rows. This can also be done by using the Excel Sort feature. Here’s how:

Select the range you want to sort. If your table has row labels that should not be moved, be sure to leave them out.

As the result, the first row in our table is sorted in alphabetical order, and the rest of the data is rearranged accordingly, preserving all correlations between the entries:

Problems with sorting alphabetically in Excel

Excel sort features are amazing, but if you are working with an imperfectly structured data, things may go terribly wrong. Here are the two common issues.

Blank or hidden columns and rows

An easy fix is to eliminate the blanks and unhide all hidden areas before sorting. Or, select the entire table first, and then alphabetize.

Unrecognizable column headers

If your column headers are formatted differently from the rest of the data, Excel is smart enough to identify them and exclude from sorting. But if the header row has no special formatting, your column headers will most likely be treated as regular entries and end up somewhere in the middle of the sorted data. To prevent this from happening, select only the data rows, and then sort.

When using the Sort dialog box, make sure the My data has headers checkbox is selected.

How to sort alphabetically in Excel with formulas

Microsoft Excel provides a variety of features to cope with many different tasks. Many, but not all. If you are facing a challenge for which there is no built-in solution, chances are it can be accomplished with a formula. It is also true for alphabetical sorting. Below, you will find a couple of examples when alphabetical order can only be done with formulas.

How to alphabetize in Excel by last name

Since there are a few common ways to write names in English, you may sometimes find yourself in a situation when the entries start with the first name while you need to alphabetize them by the last name:

Excel’s sort options cannot help in this case, so let’s resort to formulas.

With a full name in A2, insert the following formulas in two different cells, and then copy them down the columns until the last cell with data:

In C2, extract the first name:

=LEFT(A2,SEARCH(" ",A2)-1)

In D2, pull the last name:

=RIGHT(A2,LEN(A2)-SEARCH(" ",A2,1))

And then, concatenated the parts in the reverse order separated by comma:

=D2&", "&C2

The detailed explanation of the formulas can be found here, for now let’s just focus on the results:

In case you need to revert to the original First Name Last Name format, there is a little more work for you to do:

Split the names into two parts again by using the below formulas (where E2 is a comma-separated name):

Get the first name:

=RIGHT(E2, LEN(E2) - SEARCH(" ", E2))

Get the last name:

=LEFT(E2, SEARCH(" ", E2) - 2)

And bring the two parts together:

=G2&" "&H2

Perform the formulas to values conversion one more time, and you are good to go!

The process may look a bit complex on paper, but trust me, it will take only a few minutes in your Excel. In fact, it will take even less time than reading this tutorial, let alone alphabetizing the names manually 🙂

How to alphabetize each row individually in Excel

In one of the previous examples we discussed how to alphabetize rows in Excel by using the Sort dialog box. In that example, we were dealing with a correlated set of data. But what if each row contains independent information? How do you alphabetize each row individually?

In case you have a reasonable number of rows, you can sort them one by one performing these steps. If you have hundreds or thousands of rows, that would be an enormous waste of time. Formulas can do the same thing much faster.

Suppose you have many rows of data that should be re-arranged alphabetically like this:

To begin with, copy the row labels to another worksheet or another location in the same sheet, and then use the following array formula to put each row in alphabetical order (where B2:D2 is the first row in the source table):

=INDEX($B2:$D2, MATCH(COLUMNS($B2:B2), COUNTIF($B2:$D2, "<="&$B2:$D2), 0))

Please remember that the correct way to enter an array formula in Excel is by pressing Ctrl + Shift + Enter.

If you are not very comfortable with Excel array formulas, please following these steps to enter it correctly in your worksheet:

Type the formula in the first cell (G2 in our case), and press

Ctrl + Shift + Enter

. As you do this, Excel will enclose the formula in {curly braces}. Do not try typing the braces manually, that won’t work.

Select the formula cell (G2) and drag the fill handle rightwards to copy the formula to other cells of the first row (up to cell I2 in this example).

Select all the formula cells in the first row (G2:I2) and drag the fill handle downwards to copy the formula to other rows.

Important note! The above formula works with a couple of caveats: your source data should not contain empty cells or duplicate values.

If your dataset has some blanks, wrap the formula in the IFERROR function:

=IFERROR(INDEX($B2:$D2,MATCH(COLUMNS($B2:B2),COUNTIF($B2:$D2,"<="&$B2:$D2),0)), "")

How this formula works

The above formula is based on the classic INDEX MATCH combination used to perform horizontal lookup in Excel. But since we need kind of “alphabetical lookup”, we have rebuilt it in this way:

COUNTIF($B2:$D2,”<=”&$B2:$D2) compares all the values in the same row with each other and returns an array of their relative ranks. For example, in row 2 it returns {2,3,1}, meaning Caden is 2nd, Oliver is 3rd, and Aria is 1st. This way, we get the lookup array for the MATCH function.

COLUMNS($B2:B2) supplies the lookup value. Due to a clever use of absolute and relative references, the returned number is incremented by 1 as we go right. That is, for G2, the lookup value is 1, for H2 – 2, for I2 – 3.

MATCH searches for the lookup value calculated by COLUMNS() in the lookup array returned by COUNTIF(), and returns its relative position. For example, for G2, the lookup value is 1, which is in the 3rd position in the lookup array, so MATCH returns 3.

Finally, INDEX extracts the real value based on its relative position in the row. For G2, it fetches the 3rd value in the range B2:D2, which is Aria.

How to sort each column alphabetically in Excel

If you are dealing with independent subsets of data organized vertically in columns, you can easily tweak the above formula to alphabetize each column individually. Just replace COLUMNS() with ROWS(), make a few column coordinates absolute and row coordinates relative and your formula is ready:

=INDEX(A$3:A$5,MATCH(ROWS(A$3:A3),COUNTIF(A$3:A$5,"<="&A$3:A$5),0))

Please remember it’s an array formula, which should be completed with Ctrl + Shift + Enter:

To have a closer look at the formulas discussed in this tutorial, you are welcome to download our Excel Alphabetical Order worksheet. I thank you for reading and hope to see you on our blog next week!

You may also be interested in

How To Increment A Value By Row Or Column In Excel / 2023

Generic Formula

Expression: This is the value, reference of expression with which you want to increment. It can be a hardcoded value or any expression that returns a valid output. It should be an absolute expression (in most cases).

Number of rows above the first formula: If you are writing this first formula in B3 then the number of rows above this formula will be 2.

[steps]: This is optional. This is the number of steps you want to jump in the next increment.

The Arithmetic operator between expression and formula can be replaced with other operators to suit the requirements of increment.

So that we are familiar with the generic formula, let’s see some examples.

Example 1: Create an Auto Increment Formula for ID Creation.

Using the general formula we write the below formula in Cell B4 and copy it down.

We have replaced the + operator with ampersand operator (&) since we wanted to concatenate. And since we are writing the first formula in Cell B4, we subtract 3 from ROW (). The result is here.

Example 2: Increment the ID every 2 steps

If you want to increment the ID every 2 steps then you will need to write this formula.

The result is:

C1 contains 100.

Next we subtract 3 from it (since there are 3 rows above the 4th row). It gives us 1. This is important. It should be a hard coded value so that it does not change as we copy the formula below.

Finally the value 1 is multiplied (or any other operation) by the starting expression. As we copy the formula below. ROW() returns 5 but subtracting value stays the same (3) and we get 2. And it continues to be the cell you want.

To add steps, we use simple multiplication.

Increment Values By Column

In the above examples we increment by rows. It will not work if you copy them in the next column of the same row.

In the above formula we used the ROW function. Similarly, we can use the COLUMN function.

Generic Formula to Increment by Columns

Number of columns on the left of the first formula: If you are writing this first formula in B3 then the number of columns on the left of this formula will be 1.

I am not giving any examples as it will be the same as the above examples.

Alternative with SEQUENCE Function

It is a new function only available for EXCEL 365 and 2019 users. It returns an array of sequential numbers. We can use it to increment values sequentially, by rows, columns or both. And yes, you can also include the steps. Using this function you will not need to copy down the formula, as Excel 365 has auto spill functionality.

So, if you want to do the same thing as you did in Example no 3. The SEQUENCE function alternative will be: