Xem Nhiều 12/2022 #️ Improve Your English Vocabulary With 10 Great Alternatives To “Good” / 2023 # Top 19 Trend | Trucbachconcert.com

Xem Nhiều 12/2022 # Improve Your English Vocabulary With 10 Great Alternatives To “Good” / 2023 # Top 19 Trend

Cập nhật thông tin chi tiết về Improve Your English Vocabulary With 10 Great Alternatives To “Good” / 2023 mới nhất trên website Trucbachconcert.com. Hy vọng nội dung bài viết sẽ đáp ứng được nhu cầu của bạn, chúng tôi sẽ thường xuyên cập nhật mới nội dung để bạn nhận được thông tin nhanh chóng và chính xác nhất.

Are you tired of always saying “good”?

Maybe you’d like to try some new English vocabulary words instead?

Using new vocabulary might not make you more popular or happier…

…But it probably will make you smarter, and also improve your ability to communicate—which can lead to many other good things!

The English vocabulary word list below shows 10 great alternatives to the word “good.”

If you’re an ESL student who wants to improve their English vocabulary, this post is for you.

If you are an ESL teacher looking for ESL vocabulary word lists, this is especially for you.

This isn’t just a list of synonyms.

After reading the descriptions and examples we have below, you’ll be able to move beyond just describing everything as “good.”

Looking forward to using more vivid and creative ways to describe people, places and experiences that you enjoy?

Let’s get started!

Download: This blog post is available as a convenient and portable PDF that you can take anywhere.

Improve Your English Vocabulary: 10 Great Alternatives to “Good”

Before we get this awesome party started, let me tell you about a cool place where you can find all these words and more: FluentU.

FluentU takes real-world videos—like music videos, movie trailers, news and inspiring talks—and turns them into personalized language learning lessons.

With FluentU you’ll be able to learn every word in context. Your vocabulary will jump through the roof in no time! Give it a try for free and see for yourself.

And now, back to our words!

Cool

In addition to being used to describe temperature, “cool” also means very good or fashionable. For example, you might describe stylish clothes as “cool” or a performance by a musician that you really enjoy.

It can also be used to express acceptance when someone makes a suggestion. For example, if someone suggests meeting to go to a movie, you could say “Cool! I’ll see you at 6 p.m.” Like “awesome,” “cool” is a popular expression for younger people, and you shouldn’t use it in more formal conversations.

Excellent

“Excellent” is used to describe something very good or of high quality. Almost anything you can describe as “good,” you can also describe as excellent. It can be used when speaking to friends, family, or coworkers when you want to emphasize that something is not just ok or good, but very good.

If someone asks “how are you,” you can respond “excellent.” Or, similar to this restaurant review, you could say “Have you been to the new restaurant downtown? The food there is excellent.”

Wonderful

“Wonderful” means great or very good. People can be wonderful, experiences can be wonderful and things can be wonderful. You can use this word in both formal and casual settings.

For example, you could say “The paintings at the art exhibition last night were wonderful,” or “I think you’ll like her. She’s a wonderful person.”

Perfect

Perfect describes something that is flawless or exactly matching the need in a particular situation.

If you have a very good day and everything happens exactly as you want it to, you could describe it as a “perfect day.” A hotel could be “perfect for families” or an actor in a movie could be “perfect for the role.” If someone suggests an idea that you like, you can say “That’s perfect” or “That sounds perfect.”

Fantastic

The word “fantastic” is used to describe something very good or exciting. It can be used in both formal and informal situations. It’s a very enthusiastic, positive word, so you should say it with some emphasis or exclamation.

For example, if someone asks you about your trip to Thailand, you could say “It was fantastic!”

Exceptional

“Exceptional” means that someone or something is above average. This adjective has a slightly more formal tone, and it’s a good word to use when you want to sound a little more sophisticated.

For example, you could say “I think Italy is one of the most beautiful countries in the world. The scenery is exceptional.”

Terrific

“Terrific” means very good or great. You can use it the same way you use “good.” It’s another very enthusiastic adjective, so only use it if you’re describing something you really like a lot.

You could describe someone’s idea or performance as “terrific,” such as “I’m very happy with the results. She did a terrific job on this project.”

Keep in mind that “terrific” can also be used to describe something very bad depending on the noun it’s paired with. For example, you could also talk about a “terrific storm” or a “terrific explosion.”

Outstanding

“Outstanding” describes something that “stands out” or is noticeably better than the alternatives. An “outstanding” book is better than all the other books you’ve read recently, or an “outstanding” hotel is one of the nicest hotels you’ve ever stayed in. This adjective is appropriate to use in casual or formal conversations.

Note that “outstanding” can also mean “unpaid” depending on the situation. So if you have an “outstanding” bill, it means that you have a bill that needs to be paid, not a “very good” bill.

Pleasant

“Pleasant” describes something that is enjoyable or likable. It can be used to describe people, places, or experiences. “Pleasant” is a little less strong than words like “outstanding,” “terrific” or “fantastic” and it can be a good word to use if something was nice, yet not the absolute best thing imaginable.

For example, you could say “We had a nice time at dinner. It was a very pleasant evening.”

Awesome

Technically, “awesome” describes something that inspires awe or wonder. Typically, however, “awesome” is used to describe people, experiences or places that are very good or impressive.

For example, you could say “I love your new watch. It looks awesome.” It’s an adjective that is particularly popular with younger people, and it’s not an expression that you would want to use in a formal or business situation.

Say goodbye to “good!” Now you have some awesome, terrific, wonderful synonyms to improve your English vocabulary way beyond the basics.

Download: This blog post is available as a convenient and portable PDF that you can take anywhere.

If you liked this post, something tells me that you’ll love FluentU, the best way to learn English with real-world videos.

Experience English immersion online!

Improve Your English Vocabulary With 10 Great Alternatives To “Good” / 2023

Are you tired of always saying “good”?

Maybe you’d like to try some new English vocabulary words instead?

Using new vocabulary might not make you more popular or happier…

…But it probably will make you smarter, and also improve your ability to communicate-which can lead to many other good things!

The English vocabulary word list below shows 10 great alternatives to the word “good.”

If you’re an ESL student who wants to improve their English vocabulary, this post is for you.

If you are an ESL teacher looking for ESL vocabulary word lists, this is especially for you.

This isn’t just a list of synonyms.

After reading the descriptions and examples we have below, you’ll be able to move beyond just describing everything as “good.”

Looking forward to using more vivid and creative ways to describe people, places and experiences that you enjoy?

Let’s get started!

Before we get this awesome party started, let me tell you about a cool place where you can find all these words and more: FluentU.

FluentU takes real-world videos-like music videos, movie trailers, news and inspiring talks-and turns them into personalized language learning lessons.

With FluentU you’ll be able to learn every word in context. Your vocabulary will jump through the roof in no time! Give it a try for free and see for yourself.

And now, back to our words!

Cool

In addition to being used to describe temperature, “cool” also means very good or fashionable. For example, you might describe stylish clothes as “cool” or a performance by a musician that you really enjoy.

It can also be used to express acceptance when someone makes a suggestion. For example, if someone suggests meeting to go to a movie, you could say “Cool! I’ll see you at 6 p.m.” Like “awesome,” “cool” is a popular expression for younger people, and you shouldn’t use it in more formal conversations.

Excellent

“Excellent” is used to describe something very good or of high quality. Almost anything you can describe as “good,” you can also describe as excellent. It can be used when speaking to friends, family, or coworkers when you want to emphasize that something is not just ok or good, but very good.

If someone asks “how are you,” you can respond “excellent.” Or, similar to this restaurant review, you could say “Have you been to the new restaurant downtown? The food there is excellent.”

Wonderful

“Wonderful” means great or very good. People can be wonderful, experiences can be wonderful and things can be wonderful. You can use this word in both formal and casual settings.

For example, you could say “The paintings at the art exhibition last night were wonderful,” or “I think you’ll like her. She’s a wonderful person.”

Perfect

Perfect describes something that is flawless or exactly matching the need in a particular situation.

If you have a very good day and everything happens exactly as you want it to, you could describe it as a “perfect day.” A hotel could be “perfect for families” or an actor in a movie could be “perfect for the role.” If someone suggests an idea that you like, you can say “That’s perfect” or “That sounds perfect.”

Fantastic

The word “fantastic” is used to describe something very good or exciting. It can be used in both formal and informal situations. It’s a very enthusiastic, positive word, so you should say it with some emphasis or exclamation.

For example, if someone asks you about your trip to Thailand, you could say “It was fantastic!”

Exceptional

“Exceptional” means that someone or something is above average. This adjective has a slightly more formal tone, and it’s a good word to use when you want to sound a little more sophisticated.

For example, you could say “I think Italy is one of the most beautiful countries in the world. The scenery is exceptional.”

Terrific

“Terrific” means very good or great. You can use it the same way you use “good.” It’s another very enthusiastic adjective, so only use it if you’re describing something you really like a lot.

You could describe someone’s idea or performance as “terrific,” such as “I’m very happy with the results. She did a terrific job on this project.”

Keep in mind that “terrific” can also be used to describe something very bad depending on the noun it’s paired with. For example, you could also talk about a “terrific storm” or a “terrific explosion.”

Outstanding

“Outstanding” describes something that “stands out” or is noticeably better than the alternatives. An “outstanding” book is better than all the other books you’ve read recently, or an “outstanding” hotel is one of the nicest hotels you’ve ever stayed in. This adjective is appropriate to use in casual or formal conversations.

Note that “outstanding” can also mean “unpaid” depending on the situation. So if you have an “outstanding” bill, it means that you have a bill that needs to be paid, not a “very good” bill.

Pleasant

“Pleasant” describes something that is enjoyable or likable. It can be used to describe people, places, or experiences. “Pleasant” is a little less strong than words like “outstanding,” “terrific” or “fantastic” and it can be a good word to use if something was nice, yet not the absolute best thing imaginable.

For example, you could say “We had a nice time at dinner. It was a very pleasant evening.”

Awesome

Technically, “awesome” describes something that inspires awe or wonder. Typically, however, “awesome” is used to describe people, experiences or places that are very good or impressive.

For example, you could say “I love your new watch. It looks awesome.” It’s an adjective that is particularly popular with younger people, and it’s not an expression that you would want to use in a formal or business situation.

Say goodbye to “good!” Now you have some awesome, terrific, wonderful synonyms to improve your English vocabulary way beyond the basics.

And One More Thing…

If you like learning English through movies and online media, you should also check out FluentU. FluentU lets you learn English from popular talk shows, catchy music videos and funny commercials, as you can see here:

The FluentU app and website makes it really easy to watch English videos. There are captions that are interactive. That means you can tap on any word to see an image, definition, and useful examples.

For example, when you tap on the word “searching,” you see this:

Learn all the vocabulary in any video with quizzes. Swipe left or right to see more examples for the word you’re learning.

The best part? FluentU remembers the vocabulary that you’re learning. It gives you extra practice with difficult words-and reminds you when it’s time to review what you’ve learned. You have a truly personalized experience.

Start using FluentU on the website with your computer or tablet or, better yet, download the FluentU app from the iTunes or from the Google Play store.

If you liked this post, something tells me that you’ll love FluentU, the best way to learn English with real-world videos.

Experience English immersion online!

10 Esl Vocabulary Games To Get Your Students Seriously Engaged / 2023

Tired of seeing only two or three students actually paying attention in your class?

It’s amazing what a difference a few fun games can make!

Things like building vocabulary are an essential part of learning English, but they can be dull. Spice up the classroom with some of these ESL vocabulary games to enhance the learning experience.

1. Last Man Standing

This game is fast-paced, but allows students some time to think. It also encourages peer learning, as students will pick up on words they hear others speaking. To play the game, grab a ball and have all the students form a circle. Name a category or theme, such as things found in a kitchen, food, professions, and so on.

Begin by tossing the ball at a student. That student will shout a word related to the theme and throw the ball to another student. As each person catches the ball, they need to come up with another word that fits the theme. If they repeat a word that has already been said or can’t think of a new one within a few seconds, they are out and must sit on the sidelines. Don’t worry, they’ll still be learning!

Take things up a notch with a different version of “Last Man Standing.” Instead of naming a theme, each student gives the next student another theme. For example, you might start off with “something red.” The first student to catch the ball could say “strawberry” and then choose another topic and throw the ball to the next student. This makes the game much more difficult, since students cannot think of a word until they know what their theme is.

2. Pictionary

Chalkboard Pictionary. To play in a classroom with many students, it’s not very practical to use the game board. This means you’ll be using the chalkboard or whiteboard at the front of the room.

The student must convey the word to his or her team using only drawings. Students cannot use words, symbols or hand gestures. Limit the time to three minutes maximum. Each correct word is a point and the first team to get 10 points is the winning team.

If you want more fun types of visual-based learning, FluentU is a great asset to have for your classroom.

3. Charades

Write down words on slips of paper for students to choose. Verbs are likely to be the easiest, but you can also use more complicated words, provided you are sure most of the students know them.

Divide the class into two teams and have one person from each team choose a piece of paper and act out the word. The teams must guess the correct word before three minutes run out. For each correct word, that team receives a point. The team that hits ten points first is the winning team.

4. Taboo Words

Taboo Words helps students practice with synonyms and descriptions. Separate the class in half and have the two teams sit on opposite sides of the room, facing each other. Each team will choose a person to sit in front of their team, facing them in the “hot seat.” You will stand behind the students and hold up a piece of paper with a word on it. The students in the hot seats will not be able to see these papers.

Teams have three minutes (or any amount of time you want to set) to get their hot seat member to say the word on the paper. The catch is, they can’t say the word under any circumstances.

Tips for playing in a large class. If you have more than 12 students in a class, things can get a little chaotic with this game. In this case, it’s usually simpler to divide everyone into teams of 5-6 people and have only one team go at a time.

5. 20 Objects

Test your students’ memories and vocabulary at the same time with this fun game. All you need is a clear desk and 20 common items from around the classroom. You can even grab things from your backpack or purse.

Arrange the objects on the desk and let students gather around to look at them. Cover everything with a sheet (or something similar) after one minute and send everyone back to their seats. Each students should write out as many items as they can remember on a piece of paper, all in English.

When everyone is done, write a list of the items on the chalkboard and allow students to self-correct. Alternatively, you can call out the objects and give a point for each one that is correctly written.

6. Categories

Students will beg to play this game once they get the hang of it! It’s a great way to fill up the last few minutes of class, too.

Have students draw six columns on their paper and write a category at the top of each column. You can choose categories that fit what you’ve been studying in class or go with some basics. Popular categories include food, names, cities or countries, furniture, verbs and clothing.

Choose a random letter and write it on the board. Give students enough time to write down a word for each category that starts with that letter. You can repeat with new letters as many times as you like.

7. Letter Scramble

8. Chalkboard Acronym

Write a word vertically on the board and then have students come up, one at a time, to write a word starting with each letter of the vertical word. For example:

C ute

U nder

P orcelain

Make this tougher by requiring the words to be related to the acronym.

9. What Am I Thinking Of?

If you’ve ever played 20 Questions, you already know how this game goes. To make it a little easier on your students, however, you’re going to include some visual clues.

Pair students up and have them think of an object. Each student should write 5-10 words describing the object on a piece of paper. When you call time, the students swap papers and try to figure out what the other person described. The first team to have both words guessed correctly wins.

10. Word Bingo

There are some fun variations to Word Bingo!

Picture Bingo: Use pictures on the Bingo card and call out the words that relate.

Synonym Bingo: Get those brains working by giving students a word that means the same thing as a word on their card.

Antonym Bingo: This is just as it sounds. Call out the antonyms of words on their cards and see how many students get it.

ESL vocabulary games make class time a little more exciting. You can use them to review previously learned words, but keep in mind that games also make great rewards for when your students do well in class.

And One More Thing…

If you’re looking for creative ways to teach English, then you’ll love using FluentU in your classroom!

It’s got a huge collection of authentic English videos that people in the English-speaking world actually watch regularly. There are tons of great choices there when you’re looking for songs for in-class activities.

You’ll find music videos, musical numbers from cinema and theater, kids’ singalongs, commercial jingles and much, much more.

On FluentU, all the videos are sorted by skill level and are carefully annotated for students.

Words come with example sentences and definitions. Students will be able to add them to their own vocabulary lists, and even see how the words are used in other videos.

For example, if a student taps on the word “searching,” they’ll see this:

Plus, these great videos are all accompanied by interactive features and active learning tools for students, like multimedia flashcards and fun games like “fill in the blank.”

It’s perfect for in-class activities, group projects and solo homework assignments. Not to mention, it’s guaranteed to get your students excited about learning English!

Sign up for a free trial and bring FluentU to your classroom today.

If you liked this post, something tells me that you’ll love FluentU, the best way to teach English with real-world videos.

Bring English immersion to your classroom!

25 Daily Affirmations To Improve Your Mindset / 2023

Post Updated on April 2, 2021

Affirmations seem to be having a moment right now. Everyone in the wellness space is praising the benefits of using affirmations in daily life, but are they all they’re cracked up to be?

At first, I was skeptical about the idea of affirming myself (it just seems so self-indulgent, right?), but I’ve come to realize how much of a positive impact they can have on my mindset.

Affirmations are a powerful way to improve your mindset on a daily basis, and research has shown that they can increase our feelings of self-worth.

In this post, I’m sharing what you need to know about affirmations and how to use them, plus a daily affirmations list that will help you maintain a positive state of mind when times are tough.

What Exactly Are Affirmations?

I’ve seen a lot of people use affirmations to convince themselves of something they perhaps don’t believe about themselves yet. Telling yourself “I’m financially abundant” when you feel broke isn’t necessarily going to make you attract more money. In fact, research has shown that people who say positive self-statements like “I’m a lovable person” when they don’t believe it can actually make them feel worse.

It’s a lot easier to affirm others than it is ourselves, but we need to remember to encourage ourselves as well.

In my opinion, a better approach is something called ” self-affirmation.” According to Lisa Legault, assistant professor of psychology at Clarkson University, “Self-affirmation is the process of reminding yourself of the values and interests ‘that constitute your true or core self’ […] It’s taking stock of who you are and what you care about.” ( Source)

Self-affirmation encourages you to think positively about the important things in your life.

Rather than trying to convince yourself that you’re beautiful when you don’t feel that way, self-affirmation encourages you to think positively about the important things in your life, like your family, career, or hobbies. This means reflecting on things that you know and believe are good about yourself and your life.

Related Post: How To Overcome Mindset Blocks That Hold You Back

Daily Affirmations List to Improve Your Mindset

I create a safe and secure space for myself wherever I am.

I give myself permission to do what is right for me.

I am confident in my ability to [fill in the blank].

I use my time and talents to help others [fill in the blank].

What I love about myself is my ability to [fill in the blank].

I feel proud of myself when I [fill in the blank].

I give myself space to grow and learn.

I allow myself to be who I am without judgment.

I listen to my intuition and trust my inner guide.

I accept my emotions and let them serve their purpose.

I give myself the care and attention that I deserve.

My drive and ambition allow me to achieve my goals.

I share my talents with the world by [fill in the blank].

I am good at helping others to [fill in the blank].

I am always headed in the right direction.

I trust that I am on the right path.

I am creatively inspired by the world around me.

My mind is full of brilliant ideas.

I put my energy into things that matter to me.

I trust myself to make the right decision.

I am becoming closer to my true self every day.

I am grateful to have people in my life who [fill in the blank].

I am learning valuable lessons from myself every day.

I am at peace with who I am as a person.

I make a difference in the world by simply existing in it.

How to Use Affirmations

The important thing is to find affirmations that resonate with you. I’ll admit that there are plenty of affirmations out there that are just too woo-woo for me and do not resonate with me. Sometimes people throw in words like “manifest” and “abundance,” but these words simply don’t resonate with me (but maybe they do for you!).

The important thing is to find affirmations that resonate with you.

Start by choosing two to three affirmations from the list below that resonate with you. From there, decide if you will say them aloud, write them down, or recite them in your head. Try to do this in the morning or before you go to bed as part of your daily routine.

The key here is that you don’t have to go through a running list of affirmations every day. Just choose a few that really speak to you and encourage you to keep moving forward.

Related Post: 5 Mindset Shifts That Have Changed My Life

Want more affirmations? Get the toolkit!

Bạn đang xem bài viết Improve Your English Vocabulary With 10 Great Alternatives To “Good” / 2023 trên website Trucbachconcert.com. Hy vọng những thông tin mà chúng tôi đã chia sẻ là hữu ích với bạn. Nếu nội dung hay, ý nghĩa bạn hãy chia sẻ với bạn bè của mình và luôn theo dõi, ủng hộ chúng tôi để cập nhật những thông tin mới nhất. Chúc bạn một ngày tốt lành!