Xem Nhiều 12/2022 #️ How To Turn A Microsoft Word Task Pane On And Off / 2023 # Top 17 Trend | Trucbachconcert.com

Xem Nhiều 12/2022 # How To Turn A Microsoft Word Task Pane On And Off / 2023 # Top 17 Trend

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Multiple task panes are available in Microsoft Word. Most only appear when needed for a specific tool or feature, others are available to turn on and off as needed. Task panes, such as the Navigation pane, the Reviewing pane, the Selection pane, and the Thesaurus Pane might not be straightforward to find when you need them or turn off when you don’t. Learn how to turn on or off a task pane in Word.

Instructions in this article apply to Word for Microsoft 365, Word 2019, Word 2016, Word 2013, and Word 2010.

How to Enable and Disable the Navigation Task Pane in Word

The Navigation pane simplifies moving through a Word document without scrolling. Open and close it as needed.

Open the Word document in which you want to open the Navigation pane.

Select the View tab.

In the Show group, select the Navigation Pane check box. The Navigation task pane opens to the left of the document.

To use a keyboard shortcut to open the Navigation pane, press Ctrl+F.

Use the Navigation pane to search the document, browse headings, browse pages, rearrange content, and more.

To change the appearance or location of the Navigation pane, select the Task Pane Options drop-down arrow and choose Size or Move.

To close the Navigation pane, select the Task Pane Options drop-down arrow and choose Close. Or, select the X in the upper-right corner of the pane.

How to Enable and Disable the Reviewing Task Pane in Word

If you track changes made to a document, the Reviewing pane shows any revisions made.

Open the Word document in which you want to open the Reviewing pane.

Select the Review tab.

In the Tracking group, select Reviewing Pane. The Reviewing pane opens to the left of the document, by default.

Select the Reviewing Pane drop-down arrow and choose Reviewing Pane Horizontal to open the Reviewing pane below the document.

To change the appearance or location of the Reviewing pane, select the Task Pane Options drop-down arrow and choose Size or Move.

To close the Reviewing pane, select the Task Pane Options drop-down arrow and choose Close. Or, select the X in the upper-right corner of the pane.

How to Enable and Disable the Selection Task Pane in Word

The Selection pane allows you to find and edit objects in a Word document.

Open the Word document in which you want to open the Selection pane.

Select the Layout or Page Layout tab.

In the Arrange group, choose Selection Pane. The task pane opens to the right of the document.

To change the appearance or location of the Selection pane, select the Task Pane Options drop-down arrow and choose Size or Move.

To close the Selection pane, select the Task Pane Options drop-down arrow and choose Close. Or, select the X in the upper-right corner of the pane.

How to Enable and Disable the Thesaurus Task Pane in Word

The Thesaurus Pane makes it easy to find alternative words to use in documents.

Open the Word document in which you want to open the Thesaurus pane.

Select the Review tab.

In the Proofing group, select Thesaurus. The Thesaurus pane opens to the right of the document.

To open the Thesaurus pane with a keyboard shortcut, press Shift+F7.

To change the appearance or location of the Thesaurus pane, select the Task Pane Options drop-down arrow and choose Size or Move.

To close the Thesaurus pane, select the Task Pane Options drop-down arrow and choose Close. Or, select the X in the upper-right corner of the pane.

How Can You Turn A Word Task Pane On And Off? / 2023

Multiple task panes are available in Microsoft Word. Most only appear when needed for a specific tool or feature, others are available to turn on and off as needed. Task panes, such as the Navigation pane, the Reviewing pane, the Selection pane, and the Thesaurus Pane might not be straightforward to find when you need them or turn off when you don’t. Learn how to turn on or off a task pane in Word.

How to Enable and Disable the Navigation Task Pane in Word

The Navigation pane simplifies moving through a Word document without scrolling. Open and close it as needed.

Open the Word document in which you want to open the Navigation pane.

In the Show group, select the Navigation Pane check box. The Navigation task pane opens to the left of the document.

To use a keyboard shortcut to open the Navigation pane, press Ctrl+ F.

Use the Navigation pane to search the document, browse headings, browse pages, rearrange content, and more.

How to Enable and Disable the Reviewing Task Pane in Word

If you track changes made to a document, the Reviewing pane shows any revisions made.

Open the Word document in which you want to open the Reviewing pane.

In the Tracking group, select Reviewing Pane. The Reviewing pane opens to the left of the document, by default.

Select the Reviewing Pane drop-down arrow and choose Reviewing Pane Horizontal to open the Reviewing pane below the document.

How to Enable and Disable the Selection Task Pane in Word

The Selection pane allows you to find and edit objects in a Word document.

Open the Word document in which you want to open the Selection pane.

Select the Layout or Page Layout tab.

In the Arrange group, choose Selection Pane. The task pane opens to the right of the document.

How to Enable and Disable the Thesaurus Task Pane in Word

The Thesaurus Pane makes it easy to find alternative words to use in documents.

Open the Word document in which you want to open the Thesaurus pane.

In the Proofing group, select Thesaurus. The Thesaurus pane opens to the right of the document.

To open the Thesaurus pane with a keyboard shortcut, press Shift+ F7.

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How To Show The Navigation Pane In Word 2010 / 2023

There are various elements of the Microsoft Word 2010 program that you might only see intermittently, or which you might only know about from working on a version of the program on a different computer. One such element is the “Navigation” pane that can be shown at the left side of Word 2010’s program window. This pane offers a convenient place to browse through the pages of your document, or to search for text within the document.

The Navigation pane is a feature that can be viewed or hidden by adjusting a setting within the program. This setting will stay applied as Word 2010 is closed and opened so, if you have previously hidden the Navigation pane, or if it was never visible to begin with, then you can follow our guide below to learn how to show the pane and start using it.

Display the Navigation Panel in Word 2010

The steps in this article will show you how to display the Navigation column at the left side of the window in Microsoft Word 2010. This column will remain visible for the entire time that Word 2010 is open. Once you no longer need the Navigation pane, you can close it by unchecking the box that you check in Step 3 below.

Step 1: Open Microsoft Word 2010.

Step 3: Check the box to the left of Navigation Pane. You should now see this pane at the left side of your window.

Matthew Burleigh has been writing tech tutorials since 2008. His writing has appeared on dozens of different websites and been read over 50 million times.

After receiving his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Computer Science he spent several years working in IT management for small businesses. However, he now works full time writing content online and creating websites.

His main writing topics include iPhones, Microsoft Office, Google Apps, Android, and Photoshop, but he has also written about many other tech topics as well.

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How To Use The Document Map In Microsoft Word / 2023

Once upon a time, Word’s Document Map had a poor reputation. That reputation was justified. Until Word 2002, it was very flaky. I’ve had Word 2000 crash while displaying the Document Map more times than I can remember.

But from Word 2002, it improved a lot, and in Word 2010 it has been re-vamped and moved to centre stage. The document map is very useful, so give it a go.

How to invoke Document Map

Figure 1: The three parts to the Navigation Pane in Word 2010

To see the Document Map:

In all versions except Word 2007: Alt-V-D. (We lost the old keyboard shortcut in Word 2007, but it was reinstated for Word 2010!!)

You’ll see the Document Map on the left of your Word screen.

What does the Document Map do?

Strictly speaking, it doesn’t do anything. It just sits there on the left of your screen. What it shows you, however, can be very useful. It shows an outline of your document. That is, it shows all the headings in your document. You get to choose whether to show just the highest-level headings, or lower-level headings as well.

How to get Document Map to display something useful

To get Document Map to display useful headings, apply the built-in heading styles to the headings in your document.

There are many ways to apply the heading styles.

In Word 2003 and earlier versions, the easiest way is probably to use the Styles combobox on the toolbar. (And if you’re used to using that, in Word 2007 and Word 2010, you can reinstate the Styles combobox to the Quick Access Toolbar.)

From the Styles combo box, choose Heading 1 for your main headings, Heading 2 for sub-headings and Heading 3 for minor headings, and so on.

How to use the Document Map to move around your document quickly

How to use the Document Map to see where you are in a document

If you have a really big document, it’s sometimes easy to get “lost”. You can see a page of text, but it’s hard to know where you are in the document.

Document Map is a good way to solve this problem. As you move around your document, the Document Map will highlight the current heading.

For example, in Figure 1, I can see that the cursor is within the section with the heading “Balloons”. In Figure 2, I can see that the cursor is within the section “Sea transport”.

How to control the number of levels that Document Map displays

There are two controls available:

How to change the format of the text in the Document Map

In Word 2007 and earlier versions, text in the Document Map is shown in style Document Map. Modify the Document Map style to suit your needs. I find that 10pt Tahoma works well. This feature was removed from Word 2010.

How to change the width of the Document Map

Hover over the vertical bar separating the Document Map from your text. Drag left or right to suit your needs. See Figure 3.

Figure 3: Hover over the vertical bar to the right of the Document Map and drag to change the width of the Document Map.

How to use the Document Map in Word 2010

The Document Map has changed substantially in Word 2010 (Figure 4). It’s not even officially called the Document Map any more, but since it does not have a new name, it seems sensible to keep using the old one.

It now shares the new “Navigation Pane” with a panel for Find and one for Thumbnails. (Except they’re not called Find and Thumbnails any more either; but, like the Document Map they don’t have new names, so using the old names seems sensible.)

There good things about the changes:

Best of all: I can drag a heading in the Document Map, and the heading, and all the paragraphs of text “below” it, will move.

The old pre-Word 2007 keyboard shortcut of Alt-V-D has been reinstated. So I can open the new Document Map with the keyboard shortcut I’ve been using for a decade or more.

Word no longer guesses about what to show in the Document Map. It displays paragraphs based solely on each paragraph’s outline level.

But there are things I don’t like so much about the new Document Map:

It shows a lot less content than the old one. It’s pretty, but because the headings are in little buttons, each one takes up a lot more space. We lose 40% to 50% of the content compared with Word 2007 (the smaller your screen resolution, the bigger the hit).

To change the number of heading levels displayed in the Document Map requires one more mouse movement than the old version. One more mouse movement in this case is a change from 2 to 3, or a reduction in productivity of 50%.

There is some [NOTE: outdated link removed by Lene Fredborg 29-Dec-2016] some good material about the new Document Map at chúng tôi written during the beta testing of Office 2010.

There are several problems with Document Map:

Document Map doesn’t show headings that are in tables. I find this really annoying. It’s a known bug that has been inherited by the “new” Document Map of Word 2010. I guess it won’t get fixed any time soon.

Document Map doesn’t show headings that are in text boxes. Even the “new” Document Map of Word 2010 fails to show headings in a text box. Until Word 2007, text in a text box did not appear in the table of contents. So we weren’t likely to put a heading in a text box. Since that bug was fixed, we can put headings in a text box, and it’s the only straight-forward way to lay text over an image. So the failure of the new document map to show headings is particularly irritating.

In the Paragraph dialog, on the Line and Page Breaks tab, tick “Page Break Before”. Or, better, use the “Keep with Next” setting to keep the paragraph on the same page as the next paragraph. Or, better still, format your document using styles that have been modified with an appropriate “Keep with next” setting.

In Word 2007 and earlier versions, sometimes the Document Map decides to display tiny, unreadable type. It’s a known bug. The solution is to switch to Outline View and then back again. That is:

For the curious or the frustrated: How does Word decide what to display in Document Map?

Word 2007 and earlier versions

More usefully, the Outline Level can be derived from the style you apply to your text. The built-in heading styles have their Outline Level fixed (Heading 1 has Outline Level 1, Heading 2 has Outline Level 2 and so on). If you create a custom style, you can modify it to have the Outline level you choose.

If your document has text with appropriate Outline Levels, Document Map will use those outline levels. If Word can’t find any text with appropriate Outline Levels, then, in Word 2007 and earlier versions, Word will guess. (In Word 2010, Word no longer guesses. Hooray!)

Turn off Document Map.

Create a new Word document.

Copy the following text into your document:

A small line of text The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.Another short line The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. jumps over the lazy dog.Few words here The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

Turn on Document Map.

You can see that Word has guessed that short, bold lines are headings and has changed the Outline Level of the paragraphs.

Since no-one ever wants Word to guess, make sure you apply appropriate styles (which have appropriate Outline Levels) to your text. Then you will be controlling what displays in Document Map.

Word 2010

Word displays text in the Document Map based entirely on the Outline Level of the paragraph. It does not guess.

Acknowledgement Fellow MVP Klaus Linke worked out the problem with the missing heading numbering in Document Map.

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