Xem Nhiều 12/2022 #️ How To Really Pronounce Gif / 2023 # Top 12 Trend | Trucbachconcert.com

Xem Nhiều 12/2022 # How To Really Pronounce Gif / 2023 # Top 12 Trend

Cập nhật thông tin chi tiết về How To Really Pronounce Gif / 2023 mới nhất trên website Trucbachconcert.com. Hy vọng nội dung bài viết sẽ đáp ứng được nhu cầu của bạn, chúng tôi sẽ thường xuyên cập nhật mới nội dung để bạn nhận được thông tin nhanh chóng và chính xác nhất.

Introduction

Throughout history, there have been numerous hotly-debated topics. That’s even more so the case today—we’ll debate about almost anything. But I don’t think there’s a segment of the population that debates issues so intensely as the web design and development community. Don’t get me wrong, we certainly have some great debates about important topics, but whoa do we argue over some ridiculous stuff too. Look no further than the debate over, of all things, the pronunciation of an image format: GIF. Some people even go so far as to make a dedicated website of such things. Crazy, right? So anyway, I made this website on how to really pronounce GIF.

Why is it the correct pronunciation?

It’s the most natural, logical way to pronounce it. That’s why when everyone comes across the word for the first time, they use a hard G.

How is it the logical pronunciation?

Every word that starts with G, then a vowel, then an F, is pronounced with a hard G. For example: Gaffe. Gift. Guff. Guffaw.

Most one-syllable words that start with G have a hard G (not an exhaustive list): Gab. Gad. Gag. Gal. Gam. Gap. Gas. Gay. Get. Gig. Gill. Gimp. Gird. Girl. Git! Give. Go. Goal. Gob. God. Gone. Gore. Got. Guide. Guild. Guilt. Gull. Gulp. Gum. Gun. Gust. Gut. Guy.

The word “gift” is the closest word to GIF, and it has a hard G. To pronounce GIF, just say “gift” without the “t”.

What about Gin, Gem, Gym, Geo, and Gel?

Gin is not a good counterexample because it’s a drink derived from juniper berries, so its name is from the Dutch jenever for “juniper”. Gem comes from the Latin gemma for “jewel”. As for the other words, they are abbreviations of larger words, so they inherited their pronunciations.

Does the G in “GIF” stand for a word that has a soft G?

No, GIF is an acronym for Graphics Interchange Format. The word “graphics” does have a hard G, but that doesn’t necessarily influence the pronunciation. That’s why JPEG, an acronym for Joint Photographic Experts Group, is not pronounced jay-feg, but rather jay-peg. Pronunciation of acronyms tends to follow pronunciation rules like any regular word. So the point here is, because the word behind the G in GIF is “graphics”, it eliminates any possible argument that could be made if the word happened to have a soft G.

Why does anyone pronounce GIF with a soft G then?

The creator of the GIF image format, Steve Wilhite of CompuServe, when deciding on the pronunciation, said he deliberately chose to echo the American peanut butter brand, Jif, and CompuServe employees would often say “Choosy developers choose GIF(jif)”, playing off of Jif’s television commercials. If you hear anyone pronounce GIF with a soft G, it’s because they know something of this history. If the Jif peanut butter company never existed, he would have never pronounced GIF with a soft G.

Speaking of Steve Wilhite, when he explains the pronunciation of GIF, he himself has to explicitly write, “It’s pronounced ‘JIF’.” He has to explain it this way because it goes against how it would naturally be pronounced.

Are there any valid arguments for pronouncing it “JIF”?

No. There are some websites out there (like this one) that try to convince people to use a soft G, but they rely solely on the way Steve Wilhite says it is. Mr. Wilhite was given a lifetime achievement award at the 2013 Webbys (Congratulations!). He used the occasion to mention again, “It’s pronounced ‘JIF’.” In an article in the New York Times Blog, Bits, he says:

“The Oxford English Dictionary accepts both pronunciations. They are wrong. It is a soft ‘G’, pronounced ‘jif’. End of story.”

Not so fast. John Simpson, Chief Editor of the Oxford English Dictionary, disagrees with Mr. Wilhite:

“However, the pronunciation with a hard g is now very widespread and readily understood. A coiner effectively loses control of a word once it’s out there…”

I’m sure you would agree, it’s far more likely that these masters of the English language understand better than anyone how to pronounce a word.

Wilhite also mentioned that he is annoyed there is still debate over the pronunciation. To be frank, isn’t it his own fault for choosing a pronunciation that simply doesn’t make sense?

So what now?

Now you can go forth and freely pronounce GIF with a hard G as you naturally would, because you have every right to do so. If you feel compelled to honor the pronunciation given by the GIF’s creator out of some sense of obligation, that’s perfectly fine too. Just don’t give those of us who pronounce it correctly a hard time. 🙂

What Buzzwords In A Job Posting Really Mean / 2023

Buzzwords in Job Descriptions

These phrases are repeated so frequently because it’s hard to encapsulate a job, company, and desired qualities of an employee in a short space.

Buzzwords in Your Resume

Don’t dismiss buzzwords in your resume either. Recruiters and hiring managers see right through a resume crowded with meaningless words. For one thing, the hiring manager probably won’t read them.

Studies show that recruiters and HR folks spend as little as seven seconds reviewing resumes before they move them to the “yes” pile-or toss them in the trash.

To make it to yes, you need to choose resume buzzwords that count. The best buzzwords describe your abilities, match them to the job qualifications, and show that you’re a better fit for the position than the other candidates.

The best approach is to focus on what you have to offer:

What can you do for the organization?

What can you do better than anyone else?

How does your previous experience reflect that?

Answer these questions in direct language, and then you can move on to finding the buzzwords and action verbs that help you sell what you offer.

Match Your Qualifications to the Job

Some of the best buzzwords aren’t trendy, and you don’t need to look far to find them. Since they are resume keywords, you can grab them right from the job listing.Choose the ones that match your qualifications to the activities and requirements that stand out in the ad.

Finally, review these lists of soft and hard skills that might apply to the job/industry. In the end, you’ll wind up with a fairly comprehensive list of keywords that relate to the job and your suitability for it. Including these words increases the chances that your resume will make it through the Applicant Tracking System and be read by a human being.

Be Prepared to Share a Story

Just remember that while buzzwords will help you get past the first review filter and show the hiring manager that you have what it takes, the way you tell the story of your career and your candidacy is what will make all the difference.

Focus your resume, abilities, and interview around how you can help solve the company’s problems, achieve its goals, and move to the next level, and you’ll have the best chance at landing the interview and the job.

Buzzwords: A – Z List

Review this A to Z list of frequently mentioned job post jargon to help decode what the phrases mean, why they were included, and how to tailor your resume and interview answers to fit what the employer is looking for.

Communication Skills

Very often written as “strong communication skills,” including this phrase means the job requires interpersonal skills, and the ability to speak and write clearly.

How to show you have the skills: You might want to emphasize responsibilities that involve working directly with clients or experience giving presentations.

Similar keywords: interpersonal skills, strong writing, and verbal skills

Detail-Oriented

From sending an email without typos to managing the details of a complicated event, detail-oriented people check, and then double-check to ensure error-free and flawless execution of any task.

How to show you have the skills: Highlight organizational responsibilities, such as planning an event, creating a schedule or calendar, or overseeing a project. Your application and behavior at the job interview can provide a firsthand demonstration of your ability to manage details.

Similar keywords: organized

Think of this as an updated version of “shows initiative”-dynamic employees take on responsibilities beyond their job description. They’re confident, can think independently, and are comfortable acting as a leader on projects and in teams.

How to show you have the skills: Emphasize ways you’ve gone beyond your job description and give examples of leadership.

Similar keywords: leadership role, self-starter, agent of change, shows initiative

Do you do well with last-minute work, unexpected fire drill assignments, unplanned late hours, and multiple deadlines? Use of this word in a job description can imply long hours. It may also indicate a company in flux, or prone to unexpected changes in direction.

How to show you have the skills: To impress interviewers, be ready with examples of how you’ve managed multiple projects or responded to a last-minute change.

Similar keywords: agile, deadline-oriented, able to multitask, works well under pressure

Or sometimes “no job too small” or “willing to pitch in”-these kinds of keyword indicate a company that may have a very flat organization. Don’t expect to have someone printing out documents for you: in a flexible work environment, workers are often expected to solve their own problems.

At a lower level, this could also indicate that you’ll be asked to do rather menial work (picking up coffee; dropping off dry cleaning).

Similar keywords: works well under pressure, thinks outside of the box, multitasking

Growth Opportunity

This could indicate a few things, from a low salary to high turnover in the job. A position with a “high potential for growth” is likely something you won’t stay at long-which could mean that you’ll be promoted to a better role, or that the job is so onerous that no one stays in the spot for very long.

Most commonly seen in start-up and tech job descriptions, ninjas-or gurus and wizards-are an updated version of “passionate” employees. Companies use this word to show that they’re looking for a superstar-the best of the best-and also to convey that the environment in the office is young, fun, and energetic.

Don’t use this word to describe yourself-it’ll seem overly self-congratulatory. Be aware that use of these types of word in job postings can indicate that the writer isn’t certain how to describe the role, and may also be a hint that the job will require long hours and burnout.

Similar keywords: Guru, wizard, rock star, Jedi, superhero, evangelist

Passionate

Use of this word in a job description indicates that employees are expected to do more than punch in and out: the company wants employees who are enthused about the work involved, the industry, and the company. No complainers or clock-watchers wanted!

How to show you have the skills: Carefully research the company before writing your cover letter and interviewing: this will help you seem engaged with the business and role.

Similar keywords: enthusiastic, high energy, committed

Results-Oriented

Did you save your company money in your last position? Eliminate an inefficiency? Participate in an award-winning project?

How to show you have the skills: Use this keyword as an excuse to trot out some of your accomplishments in your cover letter (and interview, if you get one).Including this phrase means the company is interested in candidates who save money, staff time, increase sales, or whatever the desired outcome in the job’s industry.

Self-Starter

Expect a position that won’t involve a lot of handholding, weekly meetings with supervisors, or set check-ins.

How to show you have the skills: Highlight times you’ve worked independently. If you are someone who likes to ask a lot of questions or requires feedback and affirmation, this might not be a good role for you. And if the role requires a lot of work that’s new to you, this might not be a good fit. You’ll be setting yourself up for failure if you take on a position with unfamiliar responsibilities that doesn’t provide training or supervision.

Similar keywords: proactive, works well under pressure, willing to work independently, entrepreneurial, independent, resourceful

Team Player

How to show you have the skills: Emphasize your ability to work well with others, and your strengths at brainstorming and collaborating. You may want to speak from the “we” instead of the “I” while answering some questions during an interview.

Show Don’t Tell (Your Skills)

As you plan your resume and cover letter and prep for an interview, keep this writer’s adage in mind: Show, don’t tell.

Rather than describing yourself as “a self-starter,” for example, describe a time you handled a project independently.

What The Buzzwords In A Job Posting Really Mean / 2023

Buzzwords in Job Descriptions

These phrases are repeated so frequently because it’s hard to encapsulate a job, company, and desired qualities of an employee in a short space.

Buzzwords in Your Resume

Don’t dismiss buzzwords in your resume either. Recruiters and hiring managers see right through a resume crowded with meaningless words. For one thing, the hiring manager probably won’t read them. 

Studies show that recruiters and HR folks spend as little as seven seconds reviewing resumes before they move them to the “yes” pile—or toss them in the trash.

To make it to yes, you need to choose resume buzzwords that count. The best buzzwords describe your abilities, match them to the job qualifications, and show that you’re a better fit for the position than the other candidates.

Bad resume buzzwords waste everyone’s time and dramatically reduce your new job prospects.

The best approach is to focus on what you have to offer:

What can you do for the organization?

What can you do better than anyone else?

How does your previous experience reflect that?

Answer these questions in direct language, and then you can move on to finding the buzzwords and action verbs that help you sell what you offer.

Match Your Qualifications to the Job

Some of the best buzzwords aren’t trendy, and you don’t need to look far to find them. Since they are resume keywords, you can grab them right from the job listing.Choose the ones that match your qualifications to the activities and requirements that stand out in the ad.

Finally, review these lists of soft and hard skills that might apply to the job/industry. In the end, you’ll wind up with a fairly comprehensive list of keywords that relate to the job and your suitability for it. Including these words increases the chances that your resume will make it through the Applicant Tracking System and be read by a human being.

Be Prepared to Share a Story

Just remember that while buzzwords will help you get past the first review filter and show the hiring manager that you have what it takes, the way you tell the story of your career and your candidacy is what will make all the difference.

Focus your resume, abilities, and interview around how you can help solve the company’s problems, achieve its goals, and move to the next level, and you’ll have the best chance at landing the interview and the job. 

Buzzwords: A – Z List

Review this A to Z list of frequently mentioned job post jargon to help decode what the phrases mean, why they were included, and how to tailor your resume and interview answers to fit what the employer is looking for.

Communication Skills

Very often written as “strong communication skills,” including this phrase means the job requires interpersonal skills, and the ability to speak and write clearly.

How to show you have the skills: You might want to emphasize responsibilities that involve working directly with clients or experience giving presentations.

Similar keywords: interpersonal skills, strong writing, and verbal skills

Detail-Oriented

From sending an email without typos to managing the details of a complicated event, detail-oriented people check, and then double-check to ensure error-free and flawless execution of any task.

How to show you have the skills: Highlight organizational responsibilities, such as planning an event, creating a schedule or calendar, or overseeing a project. Your application and behavior at the job interview can provide a firsthand demonstration of your ability to manage details.

Follow all application instructions carefully; have a flawless, typo-free resume and cover letter; and at your interview, show up on time, with adequate copies of your resume and a professional demeanor. 

Similar keywords: organized

Dynamic

Think of this as an updated version of “shows initiative”—dynamic employees take on responsibilities beyond their job description. They’re confident, can think independently, and are comfortable acting as a leader on projects and in teams.

How to show you have the skills: Emphasize ways you’ve gone beyond your job description and give examples of leadership.

Similar keywords: leadership role, self-starter, agent of change, shows initiative

Fast-Paced

Do you do well with last-minute work, unexpected fire drill assignments, unplanned late hours, and multiple deadlines? Use of this word in a job description can imply long hours. It may also indicate a company in flux, or prone to unexpected changes in direction.

How to show you have the skills: To impress interviewers, be ready with examples of how you’ve managed multiple projects or responded to a last-minute change.

Similar keywords: agile, deadline-oriented, able to multitask, works well under pressure

Flexible

Or sometimes “no job too small” or “willing to pitch in”—these kinds of keyword indicate a company that may have a very flat organization. Don’t expect to have someone printing out documents for you: in a flexible work environment, workers are often expected to solve their own problems.

This can indicate a need to switch gears quickly, work unexpected or atypical hours (such as nights and weekends) to get the job done, and to be able to do things outside of the job description.

At a lower level, this could also indicate that you’ll be asked to do rather menial work (picking up coffee; dropping off dry cleaning).

Similar keywords: works well under pressure, thinks outside of the box, multitasking

Growth Opportunity

This could indicate a few things, from a low salary to high turnover in the job. A position with a “high potential for growth” is likely something you won’t stay at long—which could mean that you’ll be promoted to a better role, or that the job is so onerous that no one stays in the spot for very long.

In your interview, inquire about the people who previously held the role.

Ninja

Most commonly seen in start-up and tech job descriptions, ninjas—or gurus and wizards—are an updated version of “passionate” employees. Companies use this word to show that they’re looking for a superstar—the best of the best—and also to convey that the environment in the office is young, fun, and energetic.

Don’t use this word to describe yourself—it’ll seem overly self-congratulatory. Be aware that use of these types of word in job postings can indicate that the writer isn’t certain how to describe the role, and may also be a hint that the job will require long hours and burnout.

Similar keywords: Guru, wizard, rock star, Jedi, superhero, evangelist

Passionate

Use of this word in a job description indicates that employees are expected to do more than punch in and out: the company wants employees who are enthused about the work involved, the industry, and the company. No complainers or clock-watchers wanted!

This word is particularly common in nonprofit and technology job listings.

How to show you have the skills: Carefully research the company before writing your cover letter and interviewing: this will help you seem engaged with the business and role.

Similar keywords: enthusiastic, high energy, committed

Results-Oriented

Did you save your company money in your last position? Eliminate an inefficiency? Participate in an award-winning project?

How to show you have the skills: Use this keyword as an excuse to trot out some of your accomplishments in your cover letter (and interview, if you get one).Including this phrase means the company is interested in candidates who save money, staff time, increase sales, or whatever the desired outcome in the job’s industry.

Self-Starter

Expect a position that won’t involve a lot of handholding, weekly meetings with supervisors, or set check-ins.

How to show you have the skills: Highlight times you’ve worked independently. If you are someone who likes to ask a lot of questions or requires feedback and affirmation, this might not be a good role for you. And if the role requires a lot of work that’s new to you, this might not be a good fit. You’ll be setting yourself up for failure if you take on a position with unfamiliar responsibilities that doesn’t provide training or supervision.

Similar keywords: proactive, works well under pressure, willing to work independently, entrepreneurial, independent, resourceful

Team Player

How to show you have the skills: Emphasize your ability to work well with others, and your strengths at brainstorming and collaborating. You may want to speak from the “we” instead of the “I” while answering some questions during an interview.

Show Don’t Tell (Your Skills)

As you plan your resume and cover letter and prep for an interview, keep this writer’s adage in mind: Show, don’t tell.

Look for ways to demonstrate times you’ve embodied the qualities detailed in these phrases.

Rather than describing yourself as “a self-starter,” for example, describe a time you handled a project independently.

What Pinoys Really Are Saying When You Play Dota 2 With Them / 2023

Filipino players in have earned themselves a reputation for swearing a lot, playing badly, and flat-out refusing to type or speak in English. It’s come to a point where anything that isn’t English or Chinese in the Southeast Asian servers is almost automatically dismissed as Tagalog. It’s annoying, of course, and embarrassing for other Pinoys who actually speak in English to communicate with their team.

(See: 7 kinds of players on the Dota 2 SEA server)

Now I won’t say that Pinoys don’t trash-talk or don’t swear, but here’s something to ponder on: they don’t do it all the time. Oftentimes, it’s just “Pinoys not speaking in English” as opposed to “Pinoys trash-talking in a language other than English”. So here are some Tagalog expressions and in-game language for your reference. The goal isn’t to teach you the language, but it might lessen the rage if you knew they aren’t trash-talking. We even added some in-game terms to help with gameplay communication (somehow).

Tangina/Tangina mo

– A swear word, which literally means “your mother is a whore”

Bobo/Tanga/Gago/Engot

– Stupid

Aw/Awts/Wew

– An expression for surprise, disappointment or disagreement

San punta?

– Where are you going?

Rapsi

– A slang word, which means “tastes good” and is often used after gaining anything significant such as a kill, Roshan, or a big item

(See: The Facebook video of a kid trash talking is not okay)

Basic communication

FF

– Focus fire. This doesn’t refer to Windranger’s skill. This means to focus on one hero until he goes down. So saying “FF Luna” means to focus all skills and attacks on Luna until she dies.

OM

– Everyone should go and push the mid lane with the intention of taking high ground and finishing the game. It comes from the game mode “only mid”, hence “OM”.

Rekta

– Go straight for. For example, “rekta mid” or “rekta Radiance”

Quiapo gaming

– A playstyle or strategy that consists of running away or avoiding team fights.

Basag

– Means “to break”. In-game, it means to “do damage to or take the tower”.

Kati/Makati

– Means “itchy”, but generally used to describe heroes that have high damage and are generally annoying.

(See: 5 signs that you’re still a Dota 2 noob (and how to cure it))

Heroes, items, and skills

Jumong

– Mirana’s Sacred Arrow

Dora

– Roam, Crystal Maiden

Talon

– Mirana’s Leap, Faceless Void’s Timewalk, Blink

Puno

– Treant Protector, Nature’s Prophet’s Treants

Ahas

– Shadow Shaman’s Serpent Wards

Kagat

– Pudge’s Dismember

Aso

– Lycan’s Shapeshift

Mumu/moomoo/multo

– Death Prophet’s Excorcism

Tulog

– Sleep as in the status, but may also refer to Naga Siren’s Song of the Siren or Bane Elemental’s Nightmare

Ikot

– Juggernaut’s Blade Fury

Barko/Bangka

– Kunkka’s Ghost Ship

Jeje boots/Jeje

– Arcane boots

Did you learn anything useful? Of course, this isn’t to say that it’s okay for Pinoys or any other nationality to refuse to communicate in English with their teammates. After all, Dota 2 relies much on communication. However, let’s keep in mind that just because a person isn’t speaking your language doesn’t mean he’s trash talking. Even if he is Pinoy.

Here’s some food for thought before you trash-talk:

UPDATE 28-08-14: This article has been updated to correct Kagat; add San Punta?, Aso, Talon, Rak Na Itu, Wew, Kati, and Jumong; and add “Roaming” to Dora.

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