Xem Nhiều 2/2023 #️ Enabling Power Pivot Excel 2022 # Top 9 Trend | Trucbachconcert.com

Xem Nhiều 2/2023 # Enabling Power Pivot Excel 2022 # Top 9 Trend

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Power Pivot is an Excel add-in that was first introduced in Excel 2010 by Microsoft. It allows you to harness the power of Business Intelligence right in Excel.

Read the tutorial on how to install Power Pivot in Excel 2010 here Read the tutorial on how to enable Power Pivot in Excel 2016 here

In this tutorial, you will be provided with a detailed guide on

Let’s go through each point one-by-one!

What is Power Pivot?

Power Pivot gives you the power to work with large sets of data.

In a nutshell, it allows you to use multiple data sources. Then you could import, merge and perform analysis on the resulting data.

The beautiful thing with Power Pivot is it allows you to work on Big Data with no limitations.

Imagine getting data from multiple sources like SQL Server, Oracle, XML, Excel, Microsoft Access then build a Data Model from it. Then you can analyze these all into one awesome Pivot Table!

How to Enable Power Pivot for Excel 2016?

So how do I get my hands on this super awesome add-in…I hear you say?

The good thing with Power Pivot is it already comes with your Excel 2016, we need to enable it to start using Power Pivot.

You just need to make sure you have one of these versions:

Office 365 Pro Plus

Power Pivot is NOT AVAILABLE in Office 2016 for the following products:

To work on Power Pivot, you must first understand how to open the Power Pivot window.

How to open the Power Pivot window?

Adding Data to Data Model

The first step is to add some data to your model. You can import data from two categories:

Let’s talk about each one of them in detail.

To Import data from the Current Workbook, follow the steps below:

STEP 1: Highlight the Data in your current workbook.

There are two views that are available in Power Pivot – Data View and Diagram View.

Data View

This is the view shown to Excel users by default.

Data view displays a table of your data model in a grid format, much like the standard Excel. Each table has its own tab at the bottom of the sheet. You cannot make any edits in the cells in the data view.

A data view is comprised of two parts – the Table area and the Calculation area.

Let’s look at an example of how data is displayed in Diagram View.

You have two tables – Names and Sales.

*** You can view the exact step-by-step tutorial of how this was done here: Linking Excel Tables in Power Pivot. ***

You can drag the corner of the table to resize them and can also move them to different locations.

Create Relationship in Power Pivot

In the example above, you have imported the two tables in the Power Pivot window. You can now link the ID column from the Names table with the ID column in Sales Table.

Let’s see how it can be done by following the steps below:

Create Pivot Table using Power Pivot data

You can work with millions of rows and extract data from multiple sources.

You can process calculations and analysis faster.

You can import data from multiple sources and you can also filter data and rename columns while importing.

When you import a table in Power Pivot, each table gets organized in individual tabbed pages.

You can create your own formula using DAX expression.

You can create relationships among the table to easily analyze data fields together.

You can create calculated fields and calculated columns in the data table.

Conclusion

HELPFUL RESOURCE:

You can learn more about how to use Excel by viewing our FREE Excel webinar training on and !

About The Author

Bryan is a best-selling book author of the 101 Excel Series paperback books.

Enabling Power Pivot Excel 2013

Power Pivot Excel 2013 is an Excel add-in that was first introduced in Excel 2010 by Microsoft. It allows you to harness the power of Business Intelligence right in Excel.

Read the tutorial on how to install Power Pivot in Excel 2010 here Read the tutorial on how to enable Power Pivot in Excel 2016 here

In this tutorial, you will be provided with a detailed guide on

Let’s go through each point one-by-one!

What is Power Pivot?

In a nutshell, PowerPivot Excel 2013 allows you to use multiple data sources for analysis.

Power Pivot gives you the power to work with large sets of data that are over 1 million rows!!! It lets you create models, establish relationships and create calculations.

You could import, merge and perform analysis on the resulting data. The beautiful thing with Power Pivot is it allows you to work on Big Data with no limitations.

Imagine getting data from multiple sources like SQL Server, Oracle, XML, Excel, Microsoft Access, and analyzing these all into one awesome Pivot Table!

How to Enable Power Pivot for Excel 2013?

So how do I get my hands on this super awesome add-in…I hear you say?

You need

The good thing with Power Pivot is it already comes with your Excel 2013, we need to enable it to start using Power Pivot.

You just need to make sure you have Office Professional Plus 2013 as either:

To work on Power Pivot, you must first understand how to open the Power Pivot window.

How to open the Power Pivot window?

Adding Data to Data Model

The first step is to add some data to your model. You can import data from two categories:

Let’s talk about each one of them in detail.

To Import data from the Current Workbook, follow the steps below:

STEP 1: Highlight the Data in your current workbook.

There are two views that are available in Power Pivot – Data View and Diagram View.

Data View

This is the view shown to Excel users by default.

Data view displays a table of your data model in a grid format, much like the standard Excel. Each table has its own tab at the bottom of the sheet. You cannot make any edits in the cells in the data view.

A data view is comprised of two parts – the Table area and the Calculation area.

Let’s look at an example of how data is displayed in Diagram View.

You have two tables – Names and Sales.

*** You can view the exact step-by-step tutorial of how this was done here: Linking Excel Tables in Power Pivot. ***

You can drag the corner of the table to resize them and can also move them to different locations.

Create Relationship in Power Pivot

In the example above, you have imported the two tables in the Power Pivot window. You can now link the ID column from the Names table with the ID column in Sales Table.

Let’s see how it can be done by following the steps below:

Create Pivot Table using Power Pivot data

You can work with millions of rows and extract data from multiple sources.

You can process calculations and analysis faster.

You can import data from multiple sources and you can also filter data and rename columns while importing.

When you import a table in Power Pivot, each table gets organized in individual tabbed pages.

You can create your own formula using DAX expression.

You can create relationships among the table to easily analyze data fields together.

You can create calculated fields and calculated columns in the data table.

Conclusion

HELPFUL RESOURCE:

You can learn more about how to use Excel by viewing our FREE Excel webinar training on and !

Bryan is a best-selling book author of the 101 Excel Series paperback books.

Power Pivot For Excel: What It Is And How To Use It

You’ve got data and lots of it. When you want to analyze all that data, learn how to use the Power Pivot add-in with Excel to import data sets, identify relationships, build PivotTables, and create PivotCharts.

How to Get the Excel Power Pivot Add-in

Power Pivot gives you the power of business insights and analytics app. You don’t need specialized training to develop data models and perform calculations. You just need to enable it before you can use it.

Follow Along with the Tutorial

When you want to get up and running with Power Pivot quickly, learn by example. Microsoft has several example datasets available as a free download, which contain the raw data, the Data Model, and examples of data analysis. These are great learning tools that provide insight into how professionals analyze big data.

This tutorial uses the Microsoft Student Data Model sample workbook. You’ll find a download link to the sample workbook and to a completed data model in the first note on the page.

The data in this sample Excel workbook has the following:

The workbook contains four worksheets.

Each worksheet contains related data, meaning there’s at least one column heading on a worksheet matching a column heading in another worksheet.

The data in each worksheet is formatted as a table.

Every cell in the table contains data. There are no blank cells, rows, or columns in the tables.

There are other example datasets on the Microsoft website. Explore these learning resources:

Download data from a Microsoft Access database that describes Olympic Medals.

Download three Business Intelligence samples that show how to use Power Pivot to import data, create relationships, build PivotTables, and design PivotCharts.

How to Add Data to Your Excel File and Build a Data Model

You’ve collected the data you’ll need. Now it’s time to import your data sets into Excel and automatically create a Data Model. A Data Model is similar to a relational database and provides the tabular data used in PivotTables and PivotCharts.

To import Excel data into a Power Pivot Data Model:

Open a blank worksheet and save the file with a unique name.

Select the tables you want to import.

To make sure the import was successful and the Data Model was created, go to Data and, in the Data Tools group, select Go to the Power Pivot Window.

The tabs at the bottom of the Power Pivot Window correspond to each of the tables that were imported.

Close the Power Pivot Window.

Create Relationships Between Tables with Power Pivot Excel

Now that you have a Data Model, it’s time to create relationships between each of the data tables.

How to Create PivotTables

When you use Power Pivot to create a Data Model, most of the hard work involving PivotTables and PivotCharts has been done for you. The relationships you created between the tables in your dataset are used to add the fields you’ll use to create PivotTables and PivotCharts.

In the Create PivotTable dialog box, select New Worksheet, then select OK.

To sort the PivotTable data, drag a field to the Filters area. In this example, the Class Name field is added to the Filters area so the list can be filtered to show student’s average grade for a class.

To change the calculation method used by a field in the Values area, select the dropdown box next to the field name and select Value Field Settings. In this example, Sum of Grade was changed to Average of Grade.

Analyze your data. Experiment with the filters and sort data using the column header dropdown arrows.

Convert a PivotTable into a PivotChart

If you want to visualize your PivotTable data, turn a PivotTable into a PivotChart.

Select Pivot Chart to open the Insert Chart dialog box.

Choose a chart, then select OK.

Create PivotCharts

If you’d rather analyze your data in a visual format, create a PivotChart.

In the Power Pivot window, select Home, then select the PivotTable dropdown arrow. A list of options appears.

Analyze your data. Experiment with the Filters and sort data with the column header dropdown arrows.

Thanks for letting us know!

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How To Use Powerpivot In Excel: The Ultimate Guide

Power Pivot is an add-in first introduced in Excel 2010 and now a staple part of the modern Excel. It has changed the way that we can work with and manipulate large volumes of data in Excel.

In this article, we will not only answer the question of what is Power Pivot? But also why and how to use PowerPivot with real business use cases.

Download your data files

Follow along with the steps in the article by downloading these data files

What is Power Pivot & why is it useful?

Although an Excel worksheet can handle 1,048,576 rows of data. In reality, it can struggle as you get to 100,000 or even before that depending on what you have in your workbook.

Power Pivot enables us to work with big data beyond the 1,048,576 limitation and still produce smaller, leaner and faster workbooks than a standard PivotTable.

It does this by loading the data into the internal data model of Excel and not onto a worksheet. Relationships can then be created between the different tables of data. No more VLOOKUPs to pull data together into one big list.

We can then create PivotTables based on this model to analyze multiple tables of data.

You can also use a powerful formula language in Power Pivot called DAX. This stands for Data Analysis Expressions.

The DAX language is vast and enables us to perform more complex calculations than we can do with a standard PivotTable.

So what is Power Pivot? It is really a combination of using PivotTables and DAX calculations with the internal data model of Excel for analysis of big data.

Check out this short video that explains why we need Power Pivot:

A Power Pivot use case

Let’s look at an example business use case to see where Power Pivot will help us and I’ll explain how to use PowerPivot in this case.

Let’s imagine a scenario where we export sales data from our database. This includes a CSV file of all sales transactions for a specified time period.

It also includes a CSV file with all our customers and their details, and one with all our product details.

We would like to import these 3 files into an Excel workbook to analyze them and find the top 5 selling products, as well as which countries we received over £10 million.

Previously we would have imported the files into three different sheets and then used VLOOKUPs to pull the data into one big list for use in a PivotTable.

But with Power Pivot, we will import them directly into the data model for efficient storage. Then create relationships between the tables (instead of thousands of VLOOKUPs). And perform analysis with a PivotTable and DAX.

How to get and install the Power Pivot add-in

In Excel 2013, 2016 and 365 Power Pivot is included as part of the native Excel experience. It will just take a few seconds to install it from the COM add-ins the first time you want to use it.

The Power Pivot tab will then be visible on the Ribbon.

If you are using Excel 2010 you will need to download the Power Pivot Add-In from the Microsoft Site.

How to import CSV files to the Data Model

We will now walk through our use case scenario.

You can download the files and follow along for some hands-on practice.

Download your data files

Follow along with the steps in the article by downloading these data files

Firstly we need some data. This data could already be in Excel. But often if you are working with large data sets you are getting data from a database, a folder or multiple text/CSV files.

The best way to bring this data into Excel is by using Power Query. Power Query is a tool built into Excel to make importing and transforming external data simple.

Power Query is outside the scope of this article, but here is a quick example of getting our sales data from CSV files. I will start with the chúng tôi file.

The Power Query Editor window will load. There are a lot of tools we can use here to transform the data.

This is just a quick example to get the data into the model for Power Pivot. So we will just close and load the data.

The Import Data window appears. Select Only Create Connection and check the box to Add this data to the Data Model.

The data is then loaded into the model. So you will not see it on the worksheet, but you will see a Queries and Connections pane appear showing the number of rows loaded.

The image below shows the chúng tôi file loaded. It contains 106,693 rows. That is a lot of rows, but you will see that it does not impact the performance of calculations in Power Pivot.

Repeat the process for the other 2 CSV files. When finished the loaded queries will look like below.

Viewing the Data Model in Power Pivot

The Power Pivot for Excel window is displayed.

The initial view you are taken to is called the Data View. The tables of data are shown on different tabs, similar to worksheets. This is, however, just a display and not how they are stored.

Underneath the tabs is the Calculation Area. We will talk more about this shortly when we cover measures.

This provides a better view of the model and is great for viewing the relationships between the tables which we will create.

Create relationships between the tables

With the tables loaded into the model, we will now create relationships between them. This will enable us to create PivotTables using the data from all three tables.

The Diagram View is the easiest way to set this up. Let’s start by arranging the window more efficiently.

Drag the Sales table under the Products and the Customers tables.

The Sales table contains the transactional information and is referred to as “the data”, or “the fact table”.

The Products table and the Customers table contain information on groups of objects that interact with the data and are referred to as “lookup”, or “dimension tables”.

We will create two ‘one to many’ relationships. One between the Customers table and the Sales table, and another between the Products table and the Sales table.

This is because a customer could make one or many sales with us. And the same for the products. A product could be sold once or many times.

Repeat the step to create a relationship between the Product ID field in the Sales table and the ID field in the Products table.

The image below shows the completed relationships. The filter direction of the data is displayed by an arrow, and a 1 and asterisk (*) symbols are also displayed to show the relationship type.

Create a PivotTable from the Data Model

With the Data Model set up, we can create a PivotTable.

The PivotTable appears and in the field list you can see the three tables. We can now access the fields from each table and drag them to the areas of a PivotTable as normal.

So what is Power Pivot? It is a PivotTable that uses data from the internal model.

Now let’s create one of our use case examples. We will find the top 5 selling products.

Drag the Product Name field from the Products table into the Rows area. Then drag the Total Sales field from the Sales table into the Values area.

This will sum the total for each product in our data.

We have the top 5 products in a PivotTable.

Now when we dragged the Total Sales field into the Values area of our PivotTable, it created what is called an Implicit Measure.

We can use a PivotTable from the Data Model in the same way as we may be used to doing. This is great at the beginning or if you’re just performing simple analysis. But it is better and more efficient to create measures and to use them in PivotTables.

Using DAX to create Measures

Let’s begin to have a look at the DAX language to perform calculations in Power Pivot.

There are two types of DAX calculations – Calculated Columns and Measures.

A Calculated Column is used to create additional columns in your data model. And these columns can then be used as labels in the rows, columns and Slicer areas of a PivotTable.

It is encouraged to create these columns in the original data, or in Power Query instead of the model if possible. These columns can be really useful for a further breakdown of our data such as grouping dates into weekday and weekend labels.

In this article, we are going to create the other type of DAX calculation – called a Measure. Measures are calculations that are dragged into the values area of a PivotTable such as Sum and Average.

The DAX language is huge, going far beyond the standard Sum and Average. So creating these in the model provides far more power than within a standard PivotTable and Implicit Measures.

Measures created with DAX can also be used multiple times and in multiple PivotTables (but calculated just once). This improves the processing speed. You can also assign a format to a Measure so you won’t need to format them every time they are used.

We will create a Measure to sum the Total Sales field from the Sales table.

The Measure window appears.

Select the table from the list that you would like the new measure stored within. This measure will be stored in the Sales table.

Enter a name for the measure. This measure is named Sum of Sales.

You can enter a description for a measure. Especially if complex. Here it is omitted since the name serves that role as well.

Enter the following formula into the box provided: =SUM(Sales[Total Sales])

Using a Measure in a PivotTable

With the measure created we can use it in our PivotTables for analysis.

Using the PivotTable we created earlier in the tutorial, we can remove the Sum of Total sales implicit measure.

Our new measure is shown in the list of table fields and can be dragged into the Values area as a replacement.

We will now create our other use case of showing in which countries we received over £10 million and re-use the same measure.

Insert a new PivotTable as before and drag the Country field from the Customers table into Rows, and the Sum of Sales measure from the Sales table into Values.

The countries that meet the criteria are shown as below.

Our measure has been used in both PivotTables to help us achieve both use cases. The DAX language is capable of far more and I encourage you to read further in that area.

In this article, we have answered the question of what is Power Pivot and demonstrated two business use cases on how to use PowerPivot through the entire process.

We imported the data into the model, created relationships and a measure, and then used them in PivotTables.

Power Pivot is one of the best improvements to how we use Excel. It is an extremely powerful tool and this article is an introduction to what it is capable of. I encourage you to learn and develop your Power Pivot skills even further.

Alan Murray

Alan is a Microsoft Excel MVP, Excel trainer and consultant. Most days he can be found in a classroom spreading his love and knowledge of Excel. When not in a classroom he is writing and teaching online through blogs, YouTube and podcasts. Alan lives in the UK, is a father of two and a keen runner.

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