Xem Nhiều 1/2023 #️ 30 Good Resume Words To Include And Avoid # Top 2 Trend | Trucbachconcert.com

Xem Nhiều 1/2023 # 30 Good Resume Words To Include And Avoid # Top 2 Trend

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Your resume is your first opportunity to make a good first impression, and you don’t have much time to make that impression. According to U.S. News & World Report, it takes less than 20 seconds for a hiring manager to make a decision about you based on your resume. Hiring managers need to scan your resume and find the information they need in record time so they can move on to the next resume. What that means for you is that nearly every word you include on your resume can either help get you noticed or knock you out of contention.

Know which words to include in your resume, and which to avoid, to impress the hiring manager quickly.

Top 15 Words to Include on Your Resume

Here are the best words to include on your resume according to employers who responded to a CareerBuilder survey:

The Balance

Achieved

Include action verbs throughout your resume, particularly in the work experience section of your resume. Employers want to know what you can offer the company, and action verbs show exactly what you have accomplished at previous companies. “Achieved” is a terrific action verb that shows that you have succeeded at a previous task. This makes employers feel confident that you can achieve similar things at their companies.

Improved

Improved is another useful action verb to put in your resume. This word shows that you made some sort of positive difference at a previous company. If possible, explain how you made the improvement. For example, you might say “Improved efficiency of administrative office by streamlining physical and digital file systems.” This will show not only that you achieved something, but it will also show the skills you used to achieve it.

Trained/Mentored

Managed

Like “trained” and “mentored,” “managed” is an action word that shows your ability to lead others. This is a particularly important word to include in a resume for a management position. Again, try to include the number of people you managed, particularly if it is a large number.

Created

This action word shows that you can do more than just follow instructions—you can actually construct something and contribute to a company. Whether you developed a new filing system or invented a software app, use the word “created” to show your independence, initiative, and originality.

Resolved

Employers want to hire candidates who can recognize and help solve problems. Use this action verb if you are applying for a managerial job, or any job that requires supervising others. This word will show that you are able to spot a problem and step in to solve it.

Volunteered

This action word demonstrates your willingness to step up and help with a project or task, even if you are not asked to do so. Use this word to show your initiative and your teamwork.

Influenced

Employers want job candidates who are capable of encouraging and persuading others for the good of the company. An action word like “influenced” demonstrates what you have achieved while also highlighting your leadership skills.

Increased/Decreased

An employer wants specific evidence of how you will add value to the company. One way to do this is to quantify your successes. Include numbers to demonstrate how you have helped previous companies save money, generate donations, or achieve success in other quantifiable ways. Using action words like “increased” or “decreased” will more clearly show exactly how you helped achieved success. For example, you might say, “Developed new budget that decreased office expenses by 10%” or “Increased number of donors by 15% through new fundraising initiative.”

Ideas

Employers typically want to know that job candidates are creative, innovative people who will bring new solutions to the table. In your resume, include examples of times you develop a particular idea, either on your own or as part of a team, and explain how that idea helped the company achieve success. If you are applying for a job as a manager, you might mention how you listened to your employees’ ideas, and helped them develop those ideas into something that benefits the company. This will show your delegation skills as well.

Launched

Revenue/Profit

Again, employers will want to know how you have added value to previous companies you worked for. One way to do this is to demonstrate how you made money for a company. Include any examples of times that you helped increase profits or revenue. Using numerical values as well as the words “revenue” or “profit” will show the hiring manager, at a glance, that you have a record of achieving financial success.

Under Budget

While companies want to know you will help them make money, they also want to know you’ll help them save money. Mention any time that you helped a company spend less. For example, you might say, “Organized annual fundraiser, and remained under budget by $500.”

Won

Like “achieved,” the action verb “won” shows a hiring manager that you have been successful in previous jobs. If you ever won an award at work or received some other recognition for your efforts, consider using this verb.

Top 15 Words to Avoid on Your Resume

While there are words you should include in your resume, there are also words to avoid. Here are the worst words to include on your resume, according to CareerBuilder:

Best of Breed

“Best of breed” sounds more like an American Kennel Club dog show winner than a candidate for employment. Avoid cliché and awkward phrases like this in your resume. Once a phrase becomes too common, it does not mean anything to a hiring manager.

Go-Getter

This is another empty, cliché term. If you are using this word to say you take initiative, delete this word and replace it with a specific example of a time you stepped up and took charge of a project. Examples are much more powerful than empty words.

Think Outside of the Box

This is a phrase that hiring managers have heard time and time again. Replace this phrase with a specific example of a time you demonstrated creative thinking. You can also replace “think outside of the box” with an action verb like “created,” “conceptualized,” or “developed.”

Synergy

Synergy might sound like a trendy term, but hiring managers often find it vague. Use more specific action verbs to specify what you are trying to say you accomplished. Did you “interact” or “cooperate” or “collaborate” with a variety of departments? Use one of these action verbs to clarify what you mean.

Go-to Person

This is another overused and vague phrase. Rather than using this word to describe yourself, think about what you really mean. Were you the person who delegated everyone’s responsibilities at your previous job? Were you the person people went to when they needed help mediating a conflict? Provide specific examples of how you demonstrated leadership, rather than using this term.

Thought Leadership

This phrase is very broad and unclear. If you are trying to say that you helped come up with a number of ideas for an organization, use an action verb like “influenced,” “created,” or “developed” instead.

Value Add

Again, it is a terrific idea to show how you added value in your previous jobs. However, rather than use the phrase “value add,” show specifically how you added value. Include numbers whenever possible to quantify your success. Use words like “increased/decreased,” “revenue/profits,” or “under budget” to specify how you added value.

Results-Driven

Team Player

Almost everyone says they are a team player, but it is hard to prove this. Instead of using this commonplace description, give examples of times that you collaborated with others, using action verbs like “cooperated,” “collaborated,” “mentored,” and more.

Bottom Line

Again, employers want you to quantify the ways you achieved success in your previous jobs. Rather than using an unclear phrase like “bottom line,” use numbers to show how you specifically helped the company. Whether your company’s bottom line is number of sales, budget, or some other figure, be specific.

Hard Worker

Rather than say you are a hard worker, prove it. Use specific action words and examples to demonstrate how you have worked hard in the past. Only by using examples will employers be able to believe your statements.

Strategic Thinker

This is a very vague description that does not give the employer an idea of what you would bring to the company. Describing yourself as a “thinker” portrays you as passive—instead, explain how your great thinking helped solve a problem at work. For example, you might say, “Developed and implemented inter-office memo strategy to improve communication.”

Dynamic

This adjective describes your personality rather than your work ethic or skills. There is no way to prove your outgoing personality on a resume—anyone can put the word “dynamic” on their resume. Stick to information that you can prove using examples from past work experiences. In your interview, the employer will be able to see your energetic personality.

Self-Motivated

Like the word “dynamic,” anyone can say they are “self-motivated” in their resume. However, using the word doesn’t prove anything. Instead of saying you are self-motivated, you can prove it throughout your resume. In your work summary, mention a project or achievement that you developed yourself or that you volunteered to do. If you joined any professional association, list them on your resume. These are the things that will prove your motivation.

Detail-Oriented

One of the worst (and most common) mistakes you can make on a resume is to say you are detail-oriented and then have a spelling error in your resume. Get rid of the overly used term “detail-oriented,” and instead produce a polished and well-organized resume. This will show your attention to detail If your past work has required you to be detail-oriented, explain that in your description of your work experiences. For example, you might say, “awarded Store Clerk of the Month three times for cash-handling accuracy.”

Tips on Word Choice in Resumes

Be specific. You do not want to appear vague in your resume. Hiring managers are tired of hearing clichéd words like “team player” and “hard worker.” Avoid these phrases at all cost. Include words and phrases that explain specifically what you accomplished in your previous jobs.

Use action words. Hiring managers also like to see action words in resumes because they demonstrate that you took a leadership role that produced results.

Include power words. Along with action words, other power words include popular skills, words specific to your industry, and keywords from both the job listing and the company website. Use these (without using them too often) to make your resume stand out as the hiring manager skims through it.

Use values. Also, when possible, use numbers to demonstrate how your efforts benefited your employers. For example, instead of simply saying you “added value to Best Practices PR by saving money,” you should say that you “administered a public relations budget of $500,000 and, by developing and implementing an innovative and efficient cost-saving marketing program, saved Best Practices PR over $10,000 a year for a period of three years.” 

Focus on the job. By focusing on the skills, results, and accomplishments most aligned to the job you’re applying for, you’ll have a much better chance of getting called in for an interview. Again, using keywords from the job listing will help align your resume with the job. This, coupled with word choice, will get you closer to your next job. 

Related: Best Resume Writing Services

Comprehensive List Of The Best Power Words To Include In A Resume

It’s important to use power words in your resume and cover letters when applying for jobs. Using these words helps demonstrate your strengths and highlights why you are right for the job. Power words also jazz up your job descriptions and make them seem alive, as opposed to flat.

Let’s begin by looking at the types of power words, why they are important, and how to effectively use them.

What Power Words Accomplish

Power words are used for several reasons. First, many hiring managers quickly skim through resumes and cover letters due to the high volume they receive. These power words jump off the page, quickly showing the hiring manager you have the skills and qualifications to get the job done.

Also, most resume language is repetitive and boring. If your language is the same as everyone else’s, it will be hard for you to stand out.

Finally, power words (especially keywords) are useful when a company uses an Applicant Tracking System (ATS). These tracking systems help screen applications so that employers only need to focus on the top candidates. One way an ATS works is to eliminate resumes that are missing certain keywords.

By including these words, you increase your chances of making it through the ATS and having your application read.

Types of Power Words

Action verbs: One type of power word is an action verb. This kind of verb shows your ability to succeed. These words demonstrate the skills you have used in previous jobs to achieve success.

Examples of action verbs include “accomplished,” “designed,” “initiated,” and “supervised.”

Company values: To demonstrate that you are a good fit for the company, use key terms that the company uses to describe itself. You might find this language on the company’s “About Us” web page, or in the job listing. For example, if the company identifies itself as “innovative,” one power word you might incorporate into your resume is “innovate” or “innovative.”

Popular skill words: There are certain skills and qualities that almost every employer is looking for in a job candidate. For example, employers always want an employee who is responsible, passionate, and a strong leader. Try to use this kind of language to demonstrate you have these essential skills.

Keywords: Keywords are words from the job listing that relate to particular skills or other requirements for the job. By embedding them in your resume or cover letter, you will demonstrate, at a glance, that you fit the requirements of the position. Keywords might be “analyzed,” “quantified,” “planned,” “programmed,” “designed,” “taught,” or “trained.”

Industry buzzwords and jargon: Each industry has certain keywords that are important. Knowing and accurately using those words demonstrates you have the necessary hard skills.

Resume buzzwords: You can decode the buzzwords that employers use in job postings, and use them to highlight your relevant skills in your resume.

Sprinkle the appropriate buzzwords into your resume and cover letter to demonstrate that you are a part of the industry. Some common buzzwords are experienced,” “expert,” “skilled,” “facilitated,” “launched,” and “demonstrated.”

How to Use Power Words

You can include power words throughout your resume, including in your job descriptions, resume summary statement, and your cover letter.

Finally, it’s very important that you only use terms you are familiar with.

Power Words for Resumes and Cover Letters

A-D

E-H

I-M

N-S

T-Z

Related: Best Resume Writing Services

30 Words That Will Make Or Break Your Resume

Your resume is your first opportunity to make a good first impression, and you don’t have much time to make that impression. According to U.S. News & World Report, it takes less than 20 seconds for a hiring manager to make a decision about you based on your resume. Hiring managers need to scan your resume and find the information they need in record time so they can move on to the next resume. What that means for you is that nearly every word you include on your resume can either help get you noticed or knock you out of contention.

Know which words to include in your resume, and which to avoid, to impress the hiring manager quickly.

Top 15 Words to Include on Your Resume

Here are the best words to include on your resume according to employers who responded to a CareerBuilder survey:

AchievedInclude action verbs throughout your resume, particularly in the work experience section of your resume. Employers want to know what you can offer the company, and action verbs show exactly what you have accomplished at previous companies. “Achieved” is a terrific action verb that shows that you have succeeded at a previous task. This makes employers feel confident that you can achieve similar things at their companies.

ImprovedImproved is another useful action verb to put in your resume. This word shows that you made some sort of positive difference at a previous company. If possible, explain how you made the improvement. For example, you might say “Improved efficiency of administrative office by streamlining physical and digital file systems.” This will show not only that you achieved something, but it will also show the skills you used to achieve it.

ManagedLike “trained” and “mentored,” “managed” is an action word that shows your ability to lead others. This is a particularly important word to include in a resume for a management position. Again, try to include the number of people you managed, particularly if it is a large number.

CreatedThis action word shows that you can do more than just follow instructions-you can actually construct something and contribute to a company. Whether you developed a new filing system or invented a software app, use the word “created” to show your independence, initiative, and originality.

VolunteeredThis action word demonstrates your willingness to step up and help with a project or task, even if you are not asked to do so. Use this word to show your initiative and your teamwork.

Increased/DecreasedAn employer wants specific evidence of how you will add value to the company. One way to do this is to quantify your successes. Include numbers to demonstrate how you have helped previous companies save money, generate donations, or achieve success in other quantifiable ways. Using action words like “increased” or “decreased” will more clearly show exactly how you helped achieved success. For example, you might say, “Developed new budget that decreased office expenses by 10%” or “Increased number of donors by 15% through new fundraising initiative.”

IdeasEmployers typically want to know that job candidates are creative, innovative people who will bring new solutions to the table. In your resume, include examples of times you develop a particular idea, either on your own or as part of a team, and explain how that idea helped the company achieve success. If you are applying for a job as a manager, you might mention how you listened to your employees’ ideas, and helped them develop those ideas into something that benefits the company. This will show your delegation skills as well.

Revenue/ProfitAgain, employers will want to know how you have added value to previous companies you worked for. One way to do this is to demonstrate how you made money for a company. Include any examples of times that you helped increase profits or revenue. Using numerical values as well as the words “revenue” or “profit” will show the hiring manager, at a glance, that you have a record of achieving financial success.

Under BudgetWhile companies want to know you will help them make money, they also want to know you’ll help them save money. Mention any time that you helped a company spend less. For example, you might say, “Organized annual fundraiser, and remained under budget by $500.”

WonLike “achieved,” the action verb “won” shows a hiring manager that you have been successful in previous jobs. If you ever won an award at work or received some other recognition for your efforts, consider using this verb.

Top 15 Words to Avoid on Your Resume

While there are words you should include in your resume, there are also words to avoid. Here are the worst words to include on your resume, according to CareerBuilder:

Best of Breed“Best of breed” sounds more like an American Kennel Club dog show winner than a candidate for employment. Avoid cliché and awkward phrases like this in your resume. Once a phrase becomes too common, it does not mean anything to a hiring manager.

Go-GetterThis is another empty, cliché term. If you are using this word to say you take initiative, delete this word and replace it with a specific example of a time you stepped up and took charge of a project. Examples are much more powerful than empty words.

SynergySynergy might sound like a trendy term, but hiring managers often find it vague. Use more specific action verbs to specify what you are trying to say you accomplished. Did you “interact” or “cooperate” or “collaborate” with a variety of departments? Use one of these action verbs to clarify what you mean.

Thought LeadershipThis phrase is very broad and unclear. If you are trying to say that you helped come up with a number of ideas for an organization, use an action verb like “influenced,” “created,” or “developed” instead.

Team PlayerAlmost everyone says they are a team player, but it is hard to prove this. Instead of using this commonplace description, give examples of times that you collaborated with others, using action verbs like “cooperated,” “collaborated,” “mentored,” and more.

Hard WorkerRather than say you are a hard worker, prove it. Use specific action words and examples to demonstrate how you have worked hard in the past. Only by using examples will employers be able to believe your statements.

Strategic ThinkerThis is a very vague description that does not give the employer an idea of what you would bring to the company. Describing yourself as a “thinker” portrays you as passive-instead, explain how your great thinking helped solve a problem at work. For example, you might say, “Developed and implemented inter-office memo strategy to improve communication.”

DynamicThis adjective describes your personality rather than your work ethic or skills. There is no way to prove your outgoing personality on a resume-anyone can put the word “dynamic” on their resume. Stick to information that you can prove using examples from past work experiences. In your interview, the employer will be able to see your energetic personality.

Tips on Word Choice in Resumes

Be specific. You do not want to appear vague in your resume. Hiring managers are tired of hearing clichéd words like “team player” and “hard worker.” Avoid these phrases at all cost. Include words and phrases that explain specifically what you accomplished in your previous jobs.

Use action words. Hiring managers also like to see action words in resumes because they demonstrate that you took a leadership role that produced results.

Include power words. Along with action words, other power words include popular skills, words specific to your industry, and keywords from both the job listing and the company website. Use these (without using them too often) to make your resume stand out as the hiring manager skims through it.

Use values. Also, when possible, use numbers to demonstrate how your efforts benefited your employers. For example, instead of simply saying you “added value to Best Practices PR by saving money,” you should say that you “administered a public relations budget of $500,000 and, by developing and implementing an innovative and efficient cost-saving marketing program, saved Best Practices PR over $10,000 a year for a period of three years.”

Focus on the job. By focusing on the skills, results, and accomplishments most aligned to the job you’re applying for, you’ll have a much better chance of getting called in for an interview. Again, using keywords from the job listing will help align your resume with the job. This, coupled with word choice, will get you closer to your next job.

Related: Best Resume Writing Services

What Are Some Good Skills To Put On A Resume? See 50+ Examples

In a second, you’ll see a list of the most universal skills to put on a resume. And you’ll be tempted to just copy-paste it into yours. Don’t. If you want your resume to land great interviews, your skills section has to fit the job opening like a glove AND differentiate you from the competition.

Spend 5 more minutes reading this article and you’ll learn:

Why you must absolutely nail your resume skills to get hired.

How to detect what skills employers look for and how to list them on your resume.

What job skills to put on a resume to land an interview.

50+ examples of skills for resumes.

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13 Top Skills to Include in your Resume

Some important soft and hard skills to include in the resume:

Problem solving

Adaptability

Time management

Organization

Oral communication

Leadership

Teamwork

Customer service

Computer skills

Sales and marketing

Reporting

Budgeting

That list above? Solid. But, again, it’s not about spraying random skills over your resume and hoping for the best. If you want results, show recruiters actual relevant skills. Read on to learn how to make the most of your abilities on your resume.

1. Soft Skills VS Hard Skills. What’s the difference?

‘Hard skills’ are transferable skills that can be acquired through practice, repetition, and education. Some examples are writing, reading, and coding. Hard skills are important because they increase a person’s productivity, efficiency and satisfaction in the workplace.

‘Soft skills’, on the other hand, are skills tied with a person’s personality and are not easily transferable. Soft skills enable people to perform well in their environment. Some examples are: social skills, communication skills, and adaptability.

Problem-solving

Adaptability

Time management

Organization

Oral communication

Collaboration

Written communication

Negotiation

Conflict resolution

According to an iCIMS study, these are the top soft skills for fresh graduates:

Adaptability

Oral communication

Problem-solving

Collaboration

Written communication

Computer skills (e.g. HTML, Java, Analytics, MS Office)

Data analysis (e.g. data mining, data crunching, database management)

Marketing (e.g. SEO, SEM, CRO, CMS)

Project management (e.g. SCRUM, PRINCE2)

Mobile and Web Development (e.g. iOS, Android)

Accounting

Languages

Driving licenses

Touch typing

Writing and editing

Machinery operation

Most skills on the hard skills list are job-specific. However, some are also transferable. For example, knowledge of foreign languages is a good skill that may come in handy in various professional contexts. So are project management and MS Office skills.

In this day and age, a huge portion of hard skills can be labeled as technical skills. This is reflected in the findings of a recent LinkedIn survey, where the top hard skills were identified as:

Cloud and Distributed Computing

Statistical Analysis and Data Mining

Middleware and Integration Software

Web Architecture and Development Framework

UI Design

Software Revision Control Systems

Data Presentation

SEO/SEM Marketing

Mobile Development

Network and Information Security

Expert Hint: Do NOT put obsolete skills on your resume. dBase or Lotus Symphony will not impress anybody. They’ll only make you look like you’re a tech-dinosaur.

Top 10 Personal Qualities Employers are Looking For

Professionalism

Drive

Enthusiasm

Confidence

Creativity

Transparency

Perseverance

Honesty

Strong work ethic

Open-mindedness

2. The Most Important Thing You Need to Know About Listing Skills on a Resume

The strength of your resume depends on your professional and personal skills.

But-

If you can easily find a list of top ten skills that employers want, so can the other 250+ candidates.

You must be smarter.

It’s not about putting any skills in the skills section of a resume.

And it’s not about listing only the top skills either (so forget mindless copy-pasting.)

It’s about tailoring your entire resume and including key skills that are relevant to the position.

In other words-

You must know how to cherry-pick and present the skills that will:

Get you past the ATS screening.

Draw the recruiter’s attention for longer than 7 seconds.

Land you the interview.

Get you the job.

And this is exactly what you will learn in the following sections.

3. How to Identify the *Right* Skills

There’s only one rule: make your resume relevant in each and every way.

Don’t limit your skills to a resume skills list. Sprinkle your entire resume with key skills and qualities relevant to the position.

1. Start by identifying the skills employers look for

First off, you need to find the right job offer-one that matches your professional interests and experience level.

The ad below is for a personal banker.

Delivers exceptional customer experience by acting with a customer first attitude

Ability to make personal connections, engage customers and always be courteous and professional in a team environment and proactively collaborates with others to help customers

Exudes confidence with clients when sharing product knowledge and solutions

Partnering with your branch team and Specialists to connect them to experts who can help with specialized financial needs

Strong desire and ability to influence, educate and connect customers to technology

Professional, thorough and organized with strong follow-up skills

Excellent interpersonal communication skills

Engage and partner with team members and other LOBs to offer most appropriate products

Ability to learn products, services and procedures quickly and accurately; delivers solutions that make our One Chase products work together

Now-

The phrases in highlights are what the ATS (Applicant Tracking System) will look for on your resume.

2. Describe your professional skills in terms of achievements

The next step is to blend your professional skills into your resume experience section.

Do it in an expert way.

How?

Use the resume keywords you see in the job ad. Don’t paraphrase them too much-ATSs are smart, but not smart enough.

And remember-

Your goal is not just to get through the ATS scan, but to wow the recruiter with your achievements. That’s why you must justify your skills with numbers.

Learn this simple equation by heart:

Skills + Numbers = Achievements

Here’s an example to illustrate what I mean:

Delivered exceptional customer experience by displaying a customer first attitude. Consistently scored 90% and above in customer satisfaction surveys.

Made personal connections with 50+ customers to help them with specialized financial needs and partnered with the branch team to better identify cross-sale opportunities. Over 80% of referred prospects converted into clients.

Gained expert knowledge of 20+ banking products and solutions in the first 3 months.

Educated 50+ customers about the bank’s technological solutions, e.g. online banking apps for stock exchange tracking and trading, and VIOP transactions. 70% became regular users

3. Go through your job description and the job ad again

Here’s the thing:

Your job description is full of job-related skills and keywords. But you can still give your best skills more prominence.

Create a dedicated resume skills section.

If you extract the essence from the job description above, you’ll end up with the following list of skills:

Customer service

Rapport-building

Communication

Collaboration/teamwork

Problem-solving/analytical skills

Sales

Product knowledge

Mentoring/teaching

Tech-savvy

These are the best skills to put on a resume for a personal banker.

Why?

They’re relevant to the position you’re applying for. They are your best skills. And they’re exactly what employers look for.

Now-

Revisit the job posting to make sure you didn’t miss any important skills the employer expects.

Double-check if you’re using the right skills and experience keywords.

After all, collaboration and teamwork are synonyms. But if the job posting calls this skill teamwork, stick to it.

Remember: the ATS is smart. But not too smart.

If the list of skills on your resume seems longish (more than 10 bullets), you can split it into two categories: soft skills list and hard skills list.

You’ll find more information on different types of skills for a resume in the last section.

Expert Hint: Employers start to pay more attention to candidates’ soft skills than hard skills. Mainly because soft skills cannot be easily taught. It’s part of the so-called hiring for attitude approach.

4. Include additional skills for extra value

At this point, your job description and skills sections are brimming with job-related skills.

Which doesn’t mean there isn’t room for more.

Consult the list of top ten skills for a resume at the top of the page. See if there are any you could put on your resume.

Let’s assume you’d benefit from adding such skills as adaptability and organization.

Remember:

It’s best to place your key skills throughout your entire resume.

So-

How about tuning up your resume summary a bit? See this example:

Adaptable and well-organized personal banker with 10+ years of experience. Eager to take on new professional challenges at JP Morgan Chase. Thanks to excellent communication and follow-up skills diversified the client portfolio by adding 20+ high net-worth individuals. Increased the branch revenue by 30% in Q4 2018.

Mind you-

The skills you put on a resume can’t be random or just there.

You only have one or two pages, six seconds of the recruiter’s attention, and 250+ candidates to beat-there’s simply no room for anything accidental.

5. What if there’s no job posting?

To send your application documents without a job offer, follow the same procedure.

Identifying desirable key skills is crucial. Always.

The only thing that changes is where you look for those skills.

Here’s a couple of ideas:

1. Take a long hard look at yourself, and come up with a master list of your professional skills.

For one thing, you’ll see what you can offer the employer. For another, it will be easier to judge if you’re a good fit for the position.

2. Find job offers for similar positions from other employers.

It’s likely other employers have the same expectations about the strengths candidates put on their resumes.

3. Look up other job offers from your employer of choice.

Get to know what they expect from candidates. Note all the skills they find desirable.

4. Visit the company’s website.

Learn its values and culture. Watch out for keywords to describe your core qualifications, key professional and personal skills.

5. Check out related LinkedIn profiles.

Look at the people who already work in the company and those who hold similar positions elsewhere. Pay attention to the job skills they list on their profiles.

6. Pepper your resume with all the skills you’ve learned about.

Use them to prepare your resume objective or resume summary, resume profile, job description, key skills list, and other resume sections.

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3. What to Omit

By now you realize only the relevant skills count. And you know how to list these skills on your resume.

But there’s more to it.

When your resume is filled with skills and qualities sought after by the employer, and your key skills section has 20+ items-

It’s time to separate the wheat from the chaff.

There’s one problem, though.

The task may seem impossible when every skill feels relevant.

Here’s what to do.

Once you’re done-

Get rid of all the skills you only have a basic grasp of.

Why?

Have you heard of the so-called presenter’s paradox?

In short:

Listing low-ranking skills does NOT add any value to your resume.

More than that-

So if you feel like some of your technical skills or computer skills are basic, keep them to yourself.

It takes value from it.

Let your resume highlight your best professional side.

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Key Points

CREATE YOUR COVER LETTER NOW When listing job skills on your resume, remember:

The skills you put on a resume are important for the ATS and recruiters alike.

You must always tailor your resume skills to a particular job offer.

If you’re sending a general application to a company, your skills must also be relevant.

Your resume should only list your top skills. Leave out the ones you only have a basic grasp of.

Bạn đang xem bài viết 30 Good Resume Words To Include And Avoid trên website Trucbachconcert.com. Hy vọng những thông tin mà chúng tôi đã chia sẻ là hữu ích với bạn. Nếu nội dung hay, ý nghĩa bạn hãy chia sẻ với bạn bè của mình và luôn theo dõi, ủng hộ chúng tôi để cập nhật những thông tin mới nhất. Chúc bạn một ngày tốt lành!