Xem Nhiều 11/2022 #️ 12 Beautiful And Untranslatable Japanese Words / 2023 # Top 16 Trend | Trucbachconcert.com

Xem Nhiều 11/2022 # 12 Beautiful And Untranslatable Japanese Words / 2023 # Top 16 Trend

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“If we spoke a different language, we would perceive a somewhat different world.”

‒ Ludwig Wittgenstein

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Do you agree with this quote? I know I do. Many languages have beautiful and unique words which cannot be translated. These words often represent concepts which are so unique to that culture, there is simply no equivalent in any other language.

We’ve collected 12 of our favourite Japanese words with no English equivalent.

The interesting thing about these words is that they reveal a lot about the Japanese character. Many of these words reflect Buddhist concepts which are unknown to many Westerners, but are central ideas in Japanese society.

By learning these unique Japanese words, you are one step closer to understanding the Japanese soul.

Shinrinyoku 森林浴

Shinrinyoku literally translates as ‘forest bath’. It refers to taking a walk in the forest for its restorative and therapeutic benefits. Can’t you feel yourself relaxing as you soak up all the lovely green light? Scientists have actually found that walking in the forest has many health benefits such as lowering blood pressure and stress hormones. It seems the Japanese are one step ahead with their shinrinyoku practise!

Komorebi 木漏れ日

The sunlight filtered through leaves on trees. This is a beautiful word to describe a beautiful moment. You can enjoy some komorebi while taking your shinrinyoku!

Kuidaore 食い倒れ

Kuidaore means something like ‘to eat yourself bankrupt’. The word implies a kind of extravagant love of good food and drink – so much love that you will happily spend all your money on it! It comes from the words 食い (kui – eating) and 倒れる (daoreru – to go bankrupt, be ruined). Kuidaore has come to be associated with the Dōtonbori district in Osaka, famed for its many restaurants and nightlife spots. You have been warned!

Tsundoku 積ん読

Here’s one for the book lovers. Tsundoku is the practise of acquiring books and letting them pile up, unread. Anyone who just loves books but doesn’t have time to read them as fast as they buy them will understand this one. It uses the words 積む (tsumu – to pile up) and 読 (doku – to read). It’s also a clever pun, because tsunde oku means ‘pile up and leave’.

Wabi-sabi  侘寂

Wabi-sabi means imperfect or incomplete beauty. This is a central concept in Japanese aesthetics, which comes from Buddhist teachings on the transient nature of life. A pot with a uneven edges is more beautiful than a perfectly smooth one, because it reminds us that life is not perfect. A Japanese craftsman will intentionally add in a small flaw after completing his perfect work in honour of this concept.

Kintsugi 金継ぎ

Kintsugi (金継ぎ), also known as kintsukuroi (金繕い), is the practise of mending broken pottery with gold or silver to fill the cracks. This is a perfect example of wabi-sabi. Rather than rejecting a broken item, you can find a way to make it even more beautiful. This practise accepts the break as part of the object’s unique history.

Mono no aware 物の哀れ

Mono no aware can be translated as ‘the sadness of things’. It comes from the words 物 (mono – thing) and 哀れ (aware – poignancy or pathos). The ‘sadness’ in question comes from an awareness of the transience of things, as taught by Zen Buddhism. When we view something exceptionally beautiful, we might feel sad because we know it won’t stay so beautiful forever – but appreciation only heightens the pleasure we take in the beautiful thing in that moment. The best example of mono no aware in Japanese culture is hanami, the ritual of appreciating the cherry blossoms each year. Cherry blossom are very special to the Japanese, but the flowers bloom for only two weeks in the springtime. We appreciate the flowers even more because we know they will fall soon.

Irusu 居留守

Irusu is when somebody you don’t want to speak to rings your doorbell, and you pretend nobody’s at home. I think people do this the world over, even if other languages don’t have such a concise word for it!

Nekojita 猫舌

Here’s a cute one! A nekojita is a person who is sensitive to hot foods and drinks. It literally translates as cat tongue! It’s made from the two words 猫 (neko – cat) and‎ 舌 (shita – tongue). Do cats really hate hot things? I don’t know, but this Japanese word implies that they do!

Karoshi 過労死

Karoshi means death from overworking. Tragically, the fact that there is a word for this in Japanese also tells you something about Japanese culture. Karoshi is usually associated with Japanese salarymen who work in a corporate culture of extreme long hours. The Japanese Ministry of Labour official defines karoshi as when somebody works over 100 hours of overtime in the month before their death. The phenomenon reached an all time high last year.

Shoganai しょうがない

If you live in Japan, this one will be very useful for you! Shoganai means ‘it can’t be helped’. It’s a fatalistic resignation to a situation that is out of your control. It is often used to mean that there is no point complaining about a situation, because you will not have the power to change it. Some people suggest that the concept of shoganai is why Japanese people remain so stoic in the face of natural disasters such as tsunami and earthquakes.

Natsukashii 懐かしい

Natsukashii is often translated as ‘nostalgic’. However, whereas nostalgic is a sad emotion in English, natsukashii is usually associated with positive feelings. Something is natsukashii if it allows you to relive happy memories of the past.

Want to learn more awesome Japanese words? Grab a free trial of our recommended course.

54+ Untranslatable, Beautiful Japanese Words &Amp; Phrases / 2023

Hey, you!

Learning Japanese and want to learn some beautiful Japanese words in the process?

Well, you’re in luck.

Japanese is chock full of words and phrases that are not immediately translatable into English. Words that don’t have an English counterpart and require explanation.

In this guide, you’ll learn 50+ words and phrases. Many are untranslatable. Some are. All are beautiful – in sound or meaning.

So, let’s jump in.

1. 木枯らし Cold, Wintry Wind

“Kogarashi” is a chilly, cold, wintry wind. It lets you know of the arrival of winter. You know, the kind that sends the shivers down your spine and gives you goosebumps.

When sunlight filters through the tree leaves and produces rays. You know that 木 stands for tree, 漏れ/もれ means leakage and the 日 kanji stands for the sun. So, tree leakage (of the) sun.

物/Mono means “thing.” And, “aware” looks like the English word, but it doesn’t have the same meaning or pronunciation. It means pity, sorrow or grief. So this refers to the “bittersweetness of fading beauty” – the acknowledged but appreciated, sad transience of things. Kind of like the last day of summer or the cherry blossoms – which don’t last long.

Literally it means “subtle grace” or “mysterious profundity.” This word has different meanings depending on context. But most of the time, it refers to a profound awareness of the nature of the universe – the oneness of all things – to the point where it affects you emotionally.

5. 和 Harmony

This word means peace or harmony. It implies the importance to of avoiding conflict – so as to maintain the (Wa) harmony. And it refers to Japan and the Japanese way itself.

Literally, it means change for better. Whether one time or continuously – this is not implied or intended. It’s not until later that it become continuous improvement by the Japanese business world. Toyota kicked it off.

So, now, it’s just a word (used by businesses) to describe the process of “always improving” and getting better.

Yes, the color purple. Why did it make the list of beautiful Japanese words?

Simply because of how it sounds to the ear. Say it with me – murasaki! Okay, there’s more. Back in the old, old days- say around the year 1400 – this color was the color of the upper class and only high level officials and Imperial family could wear it. So, this color is a pretty big deal and a pretty beautiful Japanese word, in my opinion.

So, 森林/shinrin means forest and 浴/yoku stands for bathing. And this refers to being immersed in a forest or talking a walk through the woods. It’s something to do to relax, reduce your stress and improve your health.

And studies confirm that this indeed lowers blood pressure and cortisol.

This is a word that can describe things that are strange or odd. For example, if you suddenly received an anonymous letter, you could use “kimyou.” It can also be used to describe creepy locations like forests, cemeteries, or houses.

Now, this isn’t a recent term and you won’t hear it much. It’s rooted in Japan’s history. It literally does mean “浮 – float” and “世 – world/society.” Although it can also be interpreted as “transient world” or “fleeting life.” Basically, this word was used to describe Japanese life-style in Edo-period Japan, where normal people escaped the pressures of the samurai state to entertainment/pleasure districts (whether theater, tea-houses, etc.).

You won’t hear it much in everyday life.

花 means flower, petal (or cherry blossom) and 吹雪 means blizzard or snowstorm. However, this typically refers to Cherry Blossoms (Sakura) and how their petals come floating down, slowly, en-mass, as if a snow storm or blizzard.

12. 風花 Flurry of Snow in a Clear Sky

13. 生き甲斐 Reason for Being

As the Japanese say, everyone has an ikigai. It’s what gets you up in the morning. It’s what moves you. What makes your life worthwhile. Work. Hobbies. Goals. Taking care of kids. Learning Japanese. It’s probably why I’m writing this at 3:17AM on a Saturday morning! Knowing your ikigai might require a lot of introspection and search. Now, let’s break it down:

生き – Iki – Meaning: living or being alive

甲斐 – kai (though it’s changed to gai) – meaning: worth or use

This is actually a Japanese proverb; a Zen Buddhist one.

Literally, it means – one time, one meeting. Usually, it’s translated as “one chance in a lifetime.” But the BEST translation is: Treasure every encounter, for it will never recur. So, that meeting you had with a friend or someone… that EXACT moment and everything that happened will never, ever happen again in this life. It was one of a kind and hence it’s worth treasuring.

15. 恋の予感 Premonition of Love

This is sort of like love at first sight but not really. There’s more. It’s not a sappy, head-over-heels, heart-pounding, butterflies-in-stomach “love.” It’s a sense you get when first meeting a person – that it’s INEVITABLE that you are going to be in love in the future. Even if you feel no love right now.

恋 – koi – love

予感 – yokan – premonition

Wabisabi describes a way of looking at the world. It’s about accepting the transcience and imperfection of things. And thus, for the time we have left, seeing beauty in the things around us. For example, take a rough, cracked, asymmetrical, simple piece of pottery – seeing beauty in that is wabisabi.

This would be a hard concept to accept for people that like new, shiny and perfect things.

It can be the reflection of the moonlight on the river. Or, it can be the gleam of light on the river during dusk. Here, 川/kawa means river and 明かり/akari means light.

This is the spirit of hospitality and friendliness to strangers.

And more importantly, you go from strangers to brothers or sisters. That kind of hospitality!

Also known as kintsukuroi. This is the art of repairing pottery with gold or silver and making something broken beautiful – usually pottery. This is an example of wabisabi where something imperfect is still beautiful!

So with kintsugi, the big point is… you can take something imperfect or broken, and make it EVEN more beautiful than ever.

Both, a flower in the mirror and a moon’s reflection on water can’t be touched. So this Japanese phrase refers to something that’s visible but can’t be touched. Something you can feel (for example, beauty or an emotion) but can’t describe in words.

Literally, this means 高嶺/high peak and 花/flower. What it TRULY means is a “goal that’s unattainable.” Something beyond your reach, like a flower!

So, anything – feelings, scents, images – that bring memories, thoughts or anticipation of a particular season. Kind of like when you smell that crisp/burning-like scent in the air, long before snow starts falling, and you know winter is coming. The Japanese love their seasons so there are different foods, different fruit (that are grown) products and decorations for different seasons.

You know how you add too many shows and movies to your Netflix queue without watching? Or buy too many vegetables that you never eat? The Japanese have a word for this, except with books. Any book lover knows this. They have books they want to read. They want some other books. And with the overwhelm, they don’t get around to any and let them pile up.

Tsundoku is a combination of the verb 積む (tsumu – to pile up), and 読 (doku – reading.)

This is one of the beautiful Japanese words that I can relate with.

This word is used to describe you when you flake out on the person at your doorstep. They ring the doorbell. *Ding-dong.* And you, suddenly grow very, very quiet, turn off the lights and hope they go away.

This word is a noun and literally means “pretending to be out.”

Literally, this word means “nostalgic” and is an adjective. But, this carries a lot more meaning and emotion to the Japanese. People don’t normally blurt out “oh, how nostalgic” in English, because no-one likes nostalgia. It’s seen as negative. For the Japanese, it’s something that brings back memories and warms the heart.

Let’s break the phrase apart. Kui (食い) means to eat and 倒れ (daore) is a bad debt or collapse. It also comes from the verb 倒れる (daoreru) which means to go bankrupt. How is the word used? It applies to foodies and people that love going out to eat.

This is a very common and a very Japanese expression. When is it used? People use it as “I can’t do anything about it. I give up.” So, it’s used when things are out of your control (and sometimes when you just don’t want to try hard.)

As much as is this an interesting Japanese phrase, it’s also disliked by others due to the overall “I won’t even try” spirit it carries.

Interestingly, this word sounds like “break.” And indeed, it is a break. This word represents a situation where you can speak freely, act freely and most importantly, enjoy yourself without worrying about your social status, relation to others, pressure or authority.

This happens at Japanese company drink-outings where the workers and their bosses get drunk and honest with each other.

Politeness and maintaining harmony is important in Japan. So, when someone does something nice. for someone else… Japanese people are compelled to return the favor. Even if they didn’t ask for the nice thing. This phrase captures that mix of needing to repay the favor as well as the annoyance of having to do it.

Old school cool like Frank Sinatra, Al Capone, disposable . However, this can also have a negative connotation; “stuff only old people like.”

Given this word’s vagueness, it’s also used as a way to say no or be vague about things. “Hey girl, Can I see you tomorrow?” “Well, it’s a bimyou…”

This is a word used to describe someone that’s a recluse and stays in. Beautiful Japanese words aside, it’s quite an issue in Japan. This word refers to adults or adolescents who have willingly pulled out of social life, interaction and live in extreme isolation. No friends. No contacts. The Japanese Ministry of Health designates this word for anyone that hasn’t left their home in over 6 months.

Let’s break this word in half. “Wasure” means “forget” and “mono” means thing. So, it literally represents items that are forgotten and list

Anywhere else, if you call someone diligent, hardworking and dedicated to a goal, there’s a negative flipside to it. They’re seen as party poopers that won’t have any fun. In Japan, “Majime” carries positive meaning.

This word is a “kakegoe” or saying of encouragement to yourself or others. In fact, it’s more so an interjection than anything. Kind of like.. “Alright…” “Well…” “Let’s do this” and such… depending on the context.

You’ll often hear Japanese people say it to themselves before they start work. You will also hear it when people plop down into a chair or couch after coming home from work. Mostly, it’s said before or just as something is about to be done – before you lift something heavy or as you sit down after a long day. It varies.

This is one of the most interesting “beautiful Japanese words” here. It’s a combination of 2 words. First, the English word “back.” Second, the German word, “schön,” which means beautiful. So, beautiful from the back.

So, the word means useless. Where do the snake and legs come from? The first character, 蛇, represents snake and the second one, 足, is legs. When you want to say something is useless or redundant, use this.

Literally, this means “mouth lonely.” And this is in regards to food. So, this is when you eat when you’re not hungry but because you have nothing better to do.

If you’re thinking that this has to be a samurai sword word, you’re right. When one buys a new car, they take it for a drive. Bed? They take it for a nap. And a sword? Well, you do what swords are designed to do. If you were a samurai back in the day, where else would you find another person? While passing them by on the street!

So, tsuji means street or crossroad and the second part, kiri, is to slice or kill.

Definitely one of the more “fun” beautiful Japanese words here.

The first character means “crimson” or “red” and the second one means “leaves.” But, in general, this term is known as the changing of colors of leaves in Autumn. In Japan, this is a pretty big deal as well, akin to admiring the cherry blossoms in the Spring.

I mean, who doesn’t want to receive food? The Japanese say “itadakimasu” before they eat. This is what’s known as a Japanese set phrase – a phrase used with certain occasions… like eating! But, as with all beautiful Japanese words, this one has more nuance to it. It also includes thanks and gratefulness to everyone who was responsible in making the food. Farmers growing the veggies. Those that have delivered it to the city. And your cook as well.

This word also goes back to the Buddhist concept of being respectful to all things.

You’ll normally see this translated as “bon appetit” but translations won’t get the meaning and feeling right.

43. おじゃまします I will disturb you in your home

Jama means disturbance. Shimasu means to do. It just means “I will bother you.” However, you use this when you enter someone’s home. It’s a sign of respect for the person you are visiting and their home.

This is another Japanese set phrase.

Like the 2 words above, this one also is a native Japanese saying and cannot be translated with one or two words alone. Otsukare is often used at the end of the day to others, like coworkers, team players or students where both of you literally worked hard.

It’s a parting greeting but is also used to acknowledge that “you have worked hard.”

While this first and foremost is used to express regret over waste – like food, there are other uses too. You can use it to say that there’s too much of something, and thus it’s a waste. Or, you can use it to say you are “mottainai” in the event that someone is too good for you.

Actually, this is a common way to say “it’s not you, ‘it’s me” as a way to reject someone in Japanese.

The real meaning of this word is just a “dislike for super hot foods and drinks.” But, for some reason, it’s made of 2 characters. The first one means cat. The second is tongue. While we have no proof that cats hate hot/warm food, that’s the way the phrase goes. So, if you can’t handle that, you’re said to have a cat’s tongue.

This is another fall-themed word. Why is it on my list of beautiful Japanese words? Well, in English, it takes 2 words to express it. In Japanese, it’s just one. And because it’s one, it carries a stronger image of autumn, fallen leaves and the atmosphere.

Hanami is literally translated as “flower viewing.” But, it is mostly used for going to see the Cherry Blossoms (also known as Sakura). This is a Japanese tradition where many Japanese head out to see the Sakura in their full bloom.

Just like there’s a “cherry blossom viewing,” there’s also a moon viewing. When does this happen? Usually in September or October when there’s a full moon.

You heard of cherry blossom viewing. You heard of moon viewing.

Well, then there is “Yukimi” which means snow viewing… and watching the snow come down. For the Japanese, this is preferably done while in a warm onsen bath/hot spring resort with a view.

Pick apart the characters and this just means “crimson” and “leaves.” However, say this word out loud. Momiji. It’s nice sounding word and hence made it on the list!

This means “feigned innocence or naïveté.” In other words, the person is pretending to be dumb and innocent, like a wolf in sheep’s clothing. However, the Japanese word here is totally different. If you pick apart the words, it means “to put on a cat.” Why cat? Well, know how cats decide to whack items off tables and look at you like they’ve done nothing wrong?

That’s where it comes from.

This word comes from ぼけとする/boketosuru – to daydream. Boke, interestingly enough, also means fool. But, don’t let that tarnish this word. It’s nice not to think sometimes. Some things are not worth thinking too much about!

You’re wondering – how in the WORLD did a wasp land on the list of beautiful Japanese words?

Well, this article is sweet like honey and it just buzzed over here.

I know, I know. No deep profound meaning. No sexy message that will send shivers down your spine. Okay, fine. But, say it with me… out loud… jiga-bachi. I think it’s a pretty nice sounding word. It feels powerful! JIGA. BACHI. Okay, it’s a personal favorite, so I stuck it last.

So… here’s my question to you:

Do you have any favorite beautiful Japanese words? Any phrases that I missed or that you want me to add to the list?

Want to learn even more words and learn Japanese? Check out my other posts:

– written by the Main Junkie

20 Beautiful Japanese Words We Really Need In English / 2023

Wabi-Sabi (WAH-bi SAH-bi)

Wabi-sabi is the most quintessential of Japanese aesthetics, but also one of the hardest to express in English. Whereas Western ideas of beauty are often rooted in the concept of the “perfect” form, the Japanese concept of beauty lies in appreciating the imperfections found in nature as all things of the natural world are impermanent and thus beautiful. Ginkaku-ji temple in Kyoto is one of the most famous examples of wabi-sabi with its natural, unfinished appearance.

Shibui is a term used to describe objects that are attractive in their austerity and restraint. If you’re a person who prefers unadorned or understated designs, then you may have a shibui sense of style.

The concept of yugen says that beauty is not just about the seen, but the unseen. One famous example is the image of “subtle shadows of bamboo on bamboo” as described by the playwright Zeami.

Mono-no-aware says that beauty is subjective, and it’s our sensitivity to the world around us that makes it beautiful. In particular, the transience of the physical world and our awareness that beauty is impermanent makes us appreciate it more. The epitome of mono-no-aware is the sight of cherry blossom petals falling in the springtime.

Komorebi, the Japanese expression for the sunlight as it filters through the trees, is made up of the kanji characters for tree (木), shine through (漏れ), and sun (日).

Wa refers to the natural order when members of a group are in harmony. In a country that views itself as a homogeneous society, conformity is highly prioritized in order to not upset the natural order of things.

Often translated as “hospitality”, omotenashi is the Japanese quality of being thoughtful and considerate of others so that you can anticipate their needs and adjust your actions accordingly. It arose in ancient times out of the tea ceremony, when the host took painstaking care to brew a beautiful cup of tea for each guest. Small, considerate acts like offering a hot towel to customers are rooted in omotenashi and are the reason for Japan’s world-famous level of customer service.

Often translated as “face”, mentsu is a concept that came to Japan via China and is closely connected to one’s honor, pride, and dignity. In an otherwise embarrassing or shameful situation, people around them may overlook – or pretend to overlook – the situation in order to help that person preserve their dignity.

Giri refers to a person’s obligations to their various social circles, including their friends, family, and even their employer. It’s tied to many social customs in Japan such as women being expected to give chocolate, known as ” giri-choco”, to their male coworkers and acquaintances on Valentine’s Day.

Nemawashi is best epitomized as several rounds of “pre-meetings” held ahead of the official meeting where a decision is announced rather than made. The term is based on a practice from gardening, where a plant’s roots are prepped before the plant is transferred or re-potted.

Whether it’s putting up with an unpleasant situation to avoid disturbing the wa, or enduring the pain of a broken bone with no more than a normal dose of ibuprofen, people in Japan are often asked to gaman, or grit it out, as a matter of character building.

The Japanese concept of enryo is a form of reserve that’s demonstrated for the sake of other people. Whether it’s refraining from talking on the phone while on the train, or refusing to take the last bite of food off a communal platter, it’s a big part of Japanese social behavior.

Mottainai is the idea of not being wasteful, which has its roots in Japan being a small island nation with limited resources. Mottainai is demonstrated in various facets of life, from using all parts of an animal’s body for cooking, to re-purposing old possessions rather than throwing them away and salvaging fruit and vegetable peels.

Furusato is another word for one’s hometown, but it’s not simply about the place where you’re from but the place your heart longs for.

Often translated directly as a sort of frustrated “yearning”, “desire”, or “longing”, akogare is not necessarily romantic or sexual in nature. Rather, it’s a deep feeling of respect and admiration that one may feel for someone they greatly look up to, usually someone who is extremely talented. This feeling of akogare is often tinged with the understanding of one’s own shortcomings and the knowledge that that same level of talent is unattainable – which is where those feelings of yearning or longing come in.

Something of a cross between being a bookworm and a hoarder, tsundoku refers to the charming tendency of some book lovers to purchase and collect so many books that they pile up unread.

A subtle emotion of bittersweet and seemingly endless pain, setsunai requires a sensitive nature to feel and is often associated with heartache and disappointment.

This four character idiom originated from the traditional tea ceremony, where every meeting was an occasion to be treasured. Today, people use it as a reminder to slow down and savor each moment, because every encounter in life occurs only once.

Literally translating to “the devotion of one’s life to the accomplishment of a task”, this phrase is often followed by ” Ganbarimasu” (頑張ります) or “I’ll do my best.”

Using the kanji characters for the four trees that flower in the springtime, cherry, plum, peach, and apricot, this four character idiom means that people shouldn’t live their lives comparing themselves to others, but instead value their own unique traits.

25 Most Beautiful Latin Words And Meanings / 2023

Some of the loveliest languages in the world trace their roots back to Latin. When you read some of the most beautiful Latin words and phrases, you can see why. Whether the ancient Romans were talking about nature, romance, or even something mundane, their language was nothing short of gorgeous.

25 Most Beautiful Latin Words and Meanings

Beautiful Latin Words for Nature

Strictly-speaking, the Latin word for “nature” is “naturae.” However, there are some amazing Latin words for beautiful natural sights and experiences. When you read these gorgeous words and phrases, it’s obvious that humans living in Ancient Rome appreciated the beauty of the natural world just as much as we do today.

Gorgeous Latin Words and Phrases About Love

The Latin word for love is “amare,” and there are few topics more beautiful than love. Unsurprisingly, the Latin language has a number of wonderful expressions that share the wisdom of ages past on this subject. These romantic sayings are perfect for wedding vows, tattoos, and more. They make it clear why the languages that come from Latin, such as French, Spanish, and Italian, are known as the ” romance languages”:

Inspiring Latin Words and Phrases

If you’re looking for a new personal statement or motto, why not turn to Latin? This language is one of beauty and power, and it makes for some inspiring expressions:

Carpe Diem

You’ve probably heard of this famous Latin phrase used in English. It’s attributed to the Roman poet Horace. “Carpe diem” means “seize the day.” This relates to making the most of the time you have.

More Lovely Latin Words and Phrases

No matter what kind of situation you encounter, there are some Latin vocabulary terms that can help. These beautiful words will come in handy.

Susurrus

The Latin word “susurrus” means “to whisper.” It’s a lovely word to say and is actually an example of onomatopoeia – a word that sounds like its action.

A Dead Language With a Legacy

When you look at how beautiful the Latin language is, it’s easy to see why it has had such an influence on other languages of the world. Even though Latin is no longer spoken and is technically a dead language, you can see Latin root words in English and many other languages still spoken today.

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